Search Results: "Arthur C. Clarke"


BOOK REVIEW

EXPEDITION TO EARTH by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: Dec. 14, 1953

"Breaking Strain views the problem of survival in a doomed space ship, a Walt Disney film baffles a future world, Earth obeys but conquers Mars, etc. Imaginative, challenging and literate."
Eleven short stories concern themselves generally with the river of time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 12, 1971

"A very disarming lightyear."
This is not major nor new Arthur Clarke but it's Arthur Clarke all the same and that's enough to give devotees galactic goosebumps in that space between their 2001 ears — yes, Son of Dr. Strangelove: Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Stanley Kubrick (and the sequel) is included here. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 25, 1961

A collection of three titles, The Deep Range (1957), The Other Side of the Sky (1958) and The City and the Stars (1956) offers two novels and 24 short stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1986

"This note of optimism and a long, Clarke-at-his-best description of life in a 2019 space station (based on present experience) lift the book out of the veil of joyless hardware."
The date is the 50th anniversary of the moonwalk, 17 years ago (ergo, 33 years hence). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FIRST FIVE FATHOMS by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: March 16, 1960

"With skin diving reaching ever greater dimensions of popularity, this illustrated book is both informative and inviting and should appeal to any reader who in any form enjoys water sports."
As the first five fathoms—approximately thirty feet—are the most vivid and the most accessible to man, this excellent text on diving restricts itself to that area of underwater life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 25, 1999

"Essential Clarke; highly recommended."
A science fiction giant (3001: The Final Odyssey, 1997, and many others), Clarke has always been equally at home in nonfiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FOUNTAINS OF PARADISE by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 29, 1978

"Not much of a novel, but the idea is one of Clarke's most captivating."
Characteristic Clarke—and parts of it are excellent. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HAMMER OF GOD by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 15, 1993

"Stretched mighty thin—despite padding with docudrama snippets—but agreeably handled and sturdily credible."
Expansion of a short story (published in a fall 1992 issue of Time magazine) about the possibility of an asteroid colliding with Earth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LIGHT OF OTHER DAYS by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 24, 2000

"Often chaotic but fizzing with ideas: one of those rare books you wish had been longer, with a more thorough exploration of the many fascinating issues it raises. ($250,000 ad/promo)"
This first collaborative effort from Clarke, the venerable author of 3001: The Final Odyssey (1997), etc., and the up-and-coming Baxter (Manifold: Time, Jan. 2000, etc.), exploits an old SF idea: a device that allows anyone to spy on anyone else, anywhere…and anytime. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CRADLE by Arthur C. Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1988

"Clarke's ideas often take wing, but here he's just muddling through."
Hard-working but mundane, near-future alien-visitor yam, as journalists, treasure-hunters, the US Navy, and alien super-robots mix it up beneath the sea off the Florida Keys. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RICHTER 10 by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1996

"Long-windedly un-Clarke-like but engagingly peopled, and, while improbable, never dull."
Collaboration between the veteran Clarke (The Hammer of God, 1993, etc.) and the late McQuay (Puppetmaster, 1991, etc.) about near-future earthquakes, politics, and environmental disaster. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 1, 1964

"It is still not finished, promising another good book."
Sunken treasure and skin-diving are a sure-fire combination for reader interest. Read full book review >