Search Results: "Arthur C. Danto"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Incisive and passionate, Danto's testimony makes an important intervention in debates over Mapplethorpe's importance. (31 duotones)"
One of our leading postmodern critics captures, in decorous prose, photographer Robert Mapplethorpe's putatively outrageous social and aesthetic vision. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

"Among the most sensible, intelligent, logical, and accessible art criticism of the last five years."
A collection of pieces written since "the end of art"—not to be confused with the death of art. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT ART IS by Arthur C. Danto
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 19, 2013

"Less a primer than a series of postgraduate lectures."
A distinguished art critic, academic and philosopher distills his views into a compact volume that is likely to provoke more debate than it resolves. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2000

"A stimulating, provocative collection."
This hefty compilation of Danto's columns on art, originally published from 1993 to 1999 in The Nation offers further proof of his distinctive ability to balance precise discussions of individual works of art with vigorous explorations of the cultural and historical milieu in which they have been created. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 1, 1994

"He holds up art triumphantly as a ticklish enigma, a moral conundrum in our midst."
In this prodigious display of intellectual bravado, Danto proves that art can be metaphysics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"An intellectual update from a profound thinker whose voice enhances the art and culture he contemplates. (Thirteen illustrations—not seen.)"
Sixteen philosophical essays (most previously published in academic journals) that, in the vein of Encounters and Reflections (1990), wrestle with questions of art by the critic who contends that Andy Warhol brought Western art history to an end. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SONGS OF DISTANT EARTH by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 12, 1987

"Still, there's much to admire here—not least Clarke's dream of civilization without fossilized hatreds and violence—and his vast audience won't be disappointed."
A short story that first appeared in 1958, expanded and polished to a high gloss. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 25, 1961

A collection of three titles, The Deep Range (1957), The Other Side of the Sky (1958) and The City and the Stars (1956) offers two novels and 24 short stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IMPERIAL EARTH by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 19, 1975

"Pleasant but oddly unformed."
As colonists from the entire solar system converge on the mother planet for the 2776 celebration, Duncan Makenzie—third of a "father-son" dynasty of clones—returns to Earth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1986

"This note of optimism and a long, Clarke-at-his-best description of life in a 2019 space station (based on present experience) lift the book out of the veil of joyless hardware."
The date is the 50th anniversary of the moonwalk, 17 years ago (ergo, 33 years hence). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A NEW BEGINNING by Addison C. Arthur
Released: Dec. 31, 2010

"Though much sifting may be required, Arthur's book is a valuable resource for those looking to better themselves."
Arthur presents an extensive compendium of advice and information that can be utilized by readers seeking to change their lives for the better. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 3, 1957

"Good."
In book form, a select selection of shorter pieces includes The Star (voted the best science fiction piece of 1956) in which the ruins of a dead continent and civilization are revealed- only to frame another unanswerable question; the title constellation of six pieces dealing with space stations; the Venture to the Moon undertaken by an American, a British and a Russian space ship- and the subsequent sequels to the landing there, etc. These and others deal largely with extraterrestial excursions which assume a greater reality now, and offer a legible, believable form of skywriting. Read full book review >