Search Results: "Arthur Herman"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"In a volume more celebrative than contemplative, Herman reveals a chauvinism that presents an eerie smiley face."
The Scots here get all the credit, for everything from humanistic philosophy to capitalism to the steam engine to Agent 007. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE IDEA OF DECLINE IN WESTERN HISTORY by Arthur Herman
NON-FICTION
Released: March 3, 1997

"A fascinating—and disturbing—study, and one that surely demands a response from those who firmly believe in the idea of progress."
A learned study of the concept of decline since the Enlightenment, sure to generate widespread discussion and debate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"Librarians, prepare for opinion-blackened margins; readers, argue and run—to more balanced historians."
A combative corrective to the view of McCarthy as red-baiting demagogue that finds the true villains in the liberal establishment and the mainstream media. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 24, 2013

"Breezy and enthusiastic but resting on a sturdy rock of research."
The author of Freedom's Forge: How American Business Produced Victory in World War II (2012) returns with a sweeping intellectual history viewed through two ancient Greek lenses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOUGLAS MACARTHUR by Arthur Herman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"Featuring the use of new archives, a highly regarded historian offers a significant reappraisal."
A freshly critical life of the great American general, whose "spectacular successes were always haunted by his equally spectacular failures." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2004

"There's plenty of courage and endurance here. Herman's thesis is less than groundbreaking, but his narrative ought to please fans of Aubrey and Hornblower—and even the Tudor kings."
The contributions of the British fleet extend beyond the inventive use of rum, sodomy, and the lash. The British Empire, argues Herman (How the Scots Invented the Modern World, 2001, etc.), would scarcely have been possible without it, and "half the world's independent nations would not exist today." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 8, 2012

"A magnificent, controversial re-examination of the role of American business in winning WWII."
It's not often that a historian comes up with a fresh approach to an absolutely critical element of the Allied victory in World War II, but Pulitzer finalist Herman (Gandhi & Churchill: The Epic Rivalry that Destroyed an Empire and Forged Our Age, 2009, etc.) has done just that. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 6, 2008

"A well-wrought historical narrative that adds significantly to our understanding of both figures."
Veteran historian Herman (To Rule the Waves: How the British Navy Shaped the Modern World, 2004, etc.) offers an ambitious, reasoned joint biography of two great men. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEGACY OF KINGS by Eleanor Herman
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 25, 2015

"Both thoroughly researched and absolutely modern, this harkens back to the slightly soapy but still reasonably intelligent mass-market historicals of an earlier era, updated just right for today's audience. (author's note, author Q-and-A, discussion questions) (Historical fantasy. 14 & up)"
Herman, best known for nonfiction about what royalty get up to in (and out of) the bedroom (Sex with Kings, 2004, etc.), changes direction to enter the teen-crossover field with straight-up historical fantasy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SUMMER ON THIRTEENTH STREET by Charlotte Herman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"The book is neither as deep nor as poignant as Holtze's Summer Endings (p. 394) nor as dramatic as Hahn's Stepping on the Cracks (above); still, it's a good, undemanding neighborhood story about the same period, for slightly younger readers. (Fiction. 8-12)"
During the Chicago summer of 1944, 11-year-old Shirley Cohen enjoys her friendship with Morton, with whom she starts a victory garden; shares malteds from the drugstore, where nice young Manny Zelznick helps his dad; waits for her adopted stray to have kittens; and speculates that the janitor, Otto, may be a spy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST PHOENIX by Richard Herman
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 2002

"As always, Herman, a retired Air Force major, evokes his far-flung battlefields with colorful authenticity (The Trojan Sea, 2001, etc.). It's his home-front warriors that seem pale and stale."
A routine thriller about our first woman president, who's burdened by political, geopolitical, and pesky un-political problems. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CITY BOY by Herman Wouk
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1948

"Nice going- with no profound social significance or jibes at modern mores."
Divorcing himself from the artificialty and effort of Aurora Dawn (1947) this is a tragi-comedy of youngsters, understandingly, amusingly, entertainingly presented, with enough bite in the interpolations of the adult world against which they carry on incessant warfare, to keep it from a too humorous approach. Read full book review >