Search Results: "Arthur C. Clarke"


BOOK REVIEW

ARTHUR C. CLARKE by Neil McAleer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Useful to specialists and students of sf, but likely to disappoint the more general reader. (Thirty b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Science journalist McAleer (The Mind-Boggling Universe, 1987; The Body Almanac, 1985) turns his attention to one of the giants of his own field. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COLLECTED STORIES OF ARTHUR C. CLARKE by Arthur C. Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Wonder."
A massive compendium brings together (most probably) every story—104 in total, at least 3 previously uncollected—ever written by grandmaster Clarke (3001: The Final Odyssey, 1997, etc). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1986

"This note of optimism and a long, Clarke-at-his-best description of life in a 2019 space station (based on present experience) lift the book out of the veil of joyless hardware."
The date is the 50th anniversary of the moonwalk, 17 years ago (ergo, 33 years hence). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 25, 1999

"Essential Clarke; highly recommended."
A science fiction giant (3001: The Final Odyssey, 1997, and many others), Clarke has always been equally at home in nonfiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

3001: THE FINAL ODYSSEY by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 12, 1997

"Clarke, while never uninteresting, long ago abandoned drama; here, he simply reports, with the dispassionate precision of HAL before he went bananas."
Fourth in Clarke's Odyssey series (2061: Odyssey Three, 1987, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRELUDE TO SPACE by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 12, 1986

"Alexson's briefing takes him from London to the base in the desert of Australia where the Prometheus is to be launched; the extensive preparations, the screening of the crew, the ultimate objectives of the mission-all this forms a precise prospectus which is more science than fiction."
An astronautical documentary of the first rocket to the moon as it is recorded by Dirk Alexson, an historian assigned to the project. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FOUNTAINS OF PARADISE by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 29, 1978

"Not much of a novel, but the idea is one of Clarke's most captivating."
Characteristic Clarke—and parts of it are excellent. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE VIEW FROM SERENDIP by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: Oct. 17, 1977

Reading Arthur Clarke is exhilarating, to say the least. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 19, 1972

"Perhaps the 2001th version of previously charted journeys but steady, reliable, and efficient."
There are one or two chips off the old monolith (a spectacular encounter with the "Outer Giants" of Space and some strange transformations; an amusing theological/galactic speculation) but most of these short stories involve familiar machinery, stranded heroes, and electronic or deep-marine monsters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PROMISE OF SPACE by Arthur C. Clarke
NON-FICTION
Released: June 5, 1968

"Publication is aimed to coincide with the release of the Clarke-Kubrick production, 2001: A Space Odyssey."
The Promise of Space is written for the same intelligent laymen the author had in mind in The Exploration of Space (1951) "all those who are interested in the 'why' and 'how' of astronautics, yet do not wish to go into too many scientific details." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 18, 1963

"684, J-246) and many adult stories of the deep; he has investigated the mysterious underwater regions himself."
Johnny Clinton's adventures begin when the ship he has stowed away on sinks. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TALES OF TEN WORLDS by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: Sept. 12, 1962

"An area with too much heat; the first baby born in space; kittens in a spaceship locker; a dead astronaut; an abacus saving men when machines fail; an ape excelling in painting; death by astronomy; crime on Mars; a killing by sunlight — these vary theme and telling satisfactorily."
Three handsful (well, 15) collected from Clarke's magazine appearances wander from a dog's warning to his master to misty conception of worlds to vanish, and offer a kaleidoscope of matters beyond human ken. Read full book review >