Search Results: "Ayana Mathis"


BOOK REVIEW

THE TWELVE TRIBES OF HATTIE by Ayana Mathis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 15, 2013

"An excellent debut that finds layers of pathos within a troubled clan."
The legacy of the Great Migration from the 1920s to the 1980s infuses this cutting, emotional collection of linked stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FIFTH LEVEL by Edward Mathis
Released: April 1, 1992

"Mathis builds up the mystery skillfully before unveiling a secret—and a bloody climax—that should've been left on the cutting- room floor."
Two cases for moody Texas p.i. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BURNED WOMAN by Edward Mathis
Released: May 31, 1989

Texas private-eye Dan Roman's fifth case (following From a High Place, etc.) strikes even closer to home than usual: following the invasion of his home by Mickey Conrad—a randy rock-star whom Dan's journalist wife Susie wants to interview—the Romans quarrel and separate; Susie goes to interview Conrad; reportedly leaves his compound . . .and disappears. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 6, 2007

"If climate change means more violent weather, this will make a good primer for those not already vulnerable to the wrath of Mother Nature."
A ferocious day of twisters spotlights the fight to boost survival odds in Oklahoma's "Tornado Alley." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Confused Spice by Mathis Bailey

"An excellent read, especially for those who love cooking, romance, and realistically poignant LGBT themes."
In Bailey's debut novel, a blossoming relationship between a gay man and his allegedly straight neighbor begins through the art of cooking. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COME AND PLAY by Ayana Lowe
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2008

"The buoyant tone is infectious, and the format invites children to contribute observations of their own. (map, photo notes, editor's note) (Picture book poetry. 6-8)"
This album pairs 29 photographs drawn from the Magnum archives with free-verse reactions collected from (anonymous) children by the editor, a New York City teacher. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EARTHSONG by Sally Rogers
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"The music is included on the back of the jacket. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Olive Wadsworth's well-known verse, ``Over in the Meadow,'' has been adapted into a folksong by Rogers; now that song becomes a rollicking read-aloud counting book that glows with rich, jewel-like colors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRANDAD BILL'S SONG by Jane Yolen
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 12, 1994

"An unusually sensitive and carefully wrought evocation of the impact of a death on a loving family.(Picture book. 4-8)"
Jon asks a question of the others who were close to Grandad too: "What did you do on the day Grandad died?" Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TURTLE AND THE MOON by Charles Turner
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1991

"A lovely idyll, with just enough story to hold attention. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A solitary turtle observes a daily round of sunning, swimming, and withdrawing into his shell for the night—until one evening he finds an unusual companion: the moon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT A WONDERFUL DAY TO BE A COW by Carolyn Lesser
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 23, 1995

"Month by month, Lesser and Mathis create an exuberant paean to life. (Picture book. 3-7)"
What a wonderful way to teach children the months of the year, on a farm where every living thing is snug and secure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"(Poetry/Picture book. 6-11)*justify no*"
Beginning with the title poem about a game in progress, a cycle that considers football's anxieties and satisfactions with entries on the ball, the coach, a touchdown, ``Ebonee'' (a girl who's a running back), etc., plus longer pieces on an injury and on the mixed feelings engendered by playing against a cousin; the season's-end trophy is celebrated with a feast of ``Curried goat and rabbit stew/fried fish chicken too/kale and mustard and collard greens/homemade ice cream and jelly beans.'' Not unusually compelling but nicely evocative, especially with Gilchrist's colorful art—in which lively action, sweeping across broad spreads, alternates with more intimate close-ups of the participants. Read full book review >