Search Results: "Baba Wagué Diakité"


BOOK REVIEW

THE MAGIC GOURD by Baba Wagué Diakité
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"Richly rewarding indeed. (Folktale. 5-10)"
An intense artistic experience awaits the reader of this highly moral, Malian version of a "magic pot" folktale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MEE-AN AND THE MAGIC SERPENT by Baba Wagué Diakité
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2007

"Combining elements of a pourquoi story and a cautionary tale, this is an enjoyable work, but not the author-illustrator's best. (Folklore. 6-9)"
Tales of humans marrying animals are known in many countries, and this example from the West African country of Mali will delight readers and listeners with its touches of humor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HUNTERMAN AND THE CROCODILE by Baba Wagué Diakité
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1997

"Sources are offered in an author's note. (Picture book/folklore. 4-7)"
DiakitÇ's first book makes bold use of memories of his childhood in West Africa and of the hand-painted ceramic tiles that appear as the illustrations in this book. ``There was a time'' when the crocodile, Bamba, and his family, finding themselves hungry and exhausted en route to Mecca, ask Donso the Hunterman to return them to the river. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"The festive, authentic, painted-tile illustrations match the ebullience of the colorful story; preschoolers will love—again—this smart and satisfying tale of monkey-see, monkey-do. (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)"
DiakitÇ (The Hunterman and the Crocodile, 1997) retells an African folktale—familiar to many children from Slobodkina's Caps For Sale (1940)—with a combination of charming storyline, cleverly executed theme, inviting illustrations, and unusual sound effects for read-aloud fun. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I LOST MY TOOTH IN AFRICA by Penda Diakité
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 1, 2006

"The young author's descriptions offer an amusing introduction to one African country, and an excellent way to encourage children to start writing their own family stories. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Penda, the author, and Amina, the subject of her older sister's book, are the children of the inventive Malian author/illustrator who has shared his culture through retellings of traditional folktales and creative ceramic-tile illustrations with distinctive borders. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE POT OF WISDOM by Adwoa Badoe
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Most of the stories will not be new to veteran Ananse fans, but the author's distinctive voice and variations give them fresh life. (Folktales. 7-10)"
Ananse generally comes out second best in these ten folktales from Ghanaian author and storyteller Badoe (Queen's New Shoes, 1998, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JAMARI’S DRUM by Ebony Bynum
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2004

"There's a whiff of magic here that hints at a lesson or metaphor, but it's the drum's beat, the catastrophe narrowly averted, and the strongly drawn African scenes, done in warm browns and golds, that will stay with younger readers. (Picture book. 7-9)"
An elder's warning that the great djembe drum must be beaten every day or "the sky would turn black and the ground would grow hot and begin to melt under our feet," turns out to be exactly prophetic in this original tale, co-written by a professional drummer and illustrated with small but striking ceramic tile paintings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"Yang's work is like a lovely painted scroll swimming with wild souls, beasts, birds, flowers, day and night sky, tragedy, and hope."
With poetic prose and vivid watercolors, Yang has created a rich portrait of life in China during the 1930s and '40s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BABA YAGA by Eric A. Kimmel
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 15, 1991

"The two renditions, both good, are quite different in flavor: complementary, not redundant. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-8)"
Another briskly-told variant of the Cinderella-cum-Hansel and Gretel story also recounted in Vasilissa the Beautiful (p. 253/C-49). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BABA YAGA by Katya Arnold
adapted by Katya Arnold, illustrated by Katya Arnold
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 1993

"Excellent source note. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-9)"
A Russian-born artist draws on the classic Afanas'ev ``Tereshichka'' (here called ``Tishka'') for a disarmingly direct and authentic introduction to the well-known witch. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BABA DUNJA'S LAST LOVE by Alina Bronsky
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 7, 2016

"With quiet understatement, Bronsky offers us a glimpse of life in the radioactive abyss."
A quiet novel about a woman who returns home after some time away—not unusual in itself, perhaps, but it is when the home she returns to is in Chernobyl. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HOUSE BABA BUILT by Ed Young
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Oct. 3, 2011

"Sophisticated, inventive art invites close viewings for patient readers in this unusual family story. (foreword, time line, author's note) (Picture book/memoir. 7-12)"
Flashes of multi-media brilliance illuminate this darkly colored, leisurely paced memoir of childhood in Shanghai. Read full book review >