Search Results: "Barbara Cooney"


BOOK REVIEW

ISLAND BOY by Barbara Cooney
Kirkus Star
illustrated by Barbara Cooney
Released: Oct. 1, 1988

"Outstanding."
One man's life, from the time his farmer father brings his family to settle on an island in Maine till the end of his long, productive life, when he leaves his daughter and grandson—who are also content to live on the island. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COCK ROBIN by Barbara Cooney
Released: Oct. 1, 1965

"In the 19th century, historians of education say, Cock Robin was acted out by school children."
Who killed Cook Robin? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 29, 1969

"And one of the most artfully designed—a succession of sturdy paintings that somehow float on the page."
An alphabet of southern colonial pastimes that you'll run your fingers over first (the flecks of oil paint are that palpable), grin at (such cheerful, airy scenes) then examine for the sly detail. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE AMERICAN SPELLER by Barbara Cooney
Released: Oct. 1, 1960

"By the time the child has absorbed this text—and he should eagerly—he will be familiar with not only the vagaries of English spelling and phonetics, but with the appealing wit of Noah Webster, a plain talking American who managed to look everywhere at once with the freshness of a child's eye."
Noah Webster's speller was, one hundred years ago, almost as much a part of the American home as the Bible. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELEANOR by Barbara Cooney
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"An author's note supplies other relevant information. (Picture book/biography. 5-9)"
"From the beginning the baby was a disappointment to her mother," Cooney (The Story of Christmas, 1995, etc.) begins in this biography of Eleanor Roosevelt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KING OF WRECK ISLAND by Barbara Cooney
Released: Aug. 25, 1941

"Amusing pictures in black and white."
This is fun- a whimsical, original and humorous story, with lots of New England saltiness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"A disarming portrait that makes clear that wealth is incidental to a happy, creative life."
A story that, like Cooney's Miss Rumphuis (1982) and Island Boy (1988), presents the life of an idiosyncratic character in the context of a historical setting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHRISTMAS by Barbara Cooney
Released: Oct. 16, 1967

"Without approaching irreverence, this is an informed, sensible presentation and a supplement to the many legendary recreations."
After recounting the Nativity as it appears in the Gospels, Miss Cooney introduces the observance of the event thus: "Long before the birth of Jesus there were midwinter festivals," signal that this is to be a historical and not a doctrinaire Christmas. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAPTAIN POTTLE'S HOUSE by Barbara Cooney
Released: Sept. 23, 1943

"In retrospect there's not much originality in the story, but that doesn't matter much as you read."
Mystery, thinly veiled and guessable, but a factor in selling a book which is fun reading in its salty sense of the coast of Maine setting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KELLYHORNS by Barbara Cooney
Released: Aug. 6, 1942

"Unfortunately the jacket is very unappealing."
The Kellyhorns are twins who were separated when their mother dies, Penny living with her father on an island off the Maine coast and Pam with an aunt on the mainland. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MISS RUMPHIUS by Barbara Cooney
Released: Oct. 11, 1982

"It's a lovely notion, in short, if not much (or too much) of a story."
You might almost believe that Barbara Cooney had a Great-Aunt Alice Rumphius who did just as we read here—else why go to the trouble of spinning out a yarn, composed of transparent storybook motifs (an elderly grandfather who carves ships' figureheads; travels to exotic places; a solitary cottage by the sea), just to arrive at an old lady who strews lupine seeds about? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHANTICLEER AND THE FOX by Geoffrey Chaucer
Released: Sept. 15, 1958

"A story which needs no defense, handled here with respect and facility."
Adapted from the Chaucer, this is the fable of the vain but wise Cock and the crafty fox. Read full book review >