Search Results: "Barbara Snow Gilbert"


BOOK REVIEW

BROKEN CHORDS by Barbara Snow Gilbert
FICTION
Released: Oct. 15, 1998

"A compassionate work. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Gilbert (Stone Water, 1996, etc.) writes sympathetically about a musical prodigy who yearns to be a normal teenager; a story that could have easily fallen to clichÇ becomes a penetrating study of the difference between technical brilliance and true virtuosity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAPER TRAIL by Barbara Snow Gilbert
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 31, 2000

"Still, readers will be hooked by the intensity of this nightmarish psychodrama. (Fiction. 11-15)"
An Oklahoma teenager sees his mother gunned down, then becomes the quarry of a militia group in this page-turner-with-a-twist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STONE WATER by Barbara Snow Gilbert
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"No reader of any age will remain unmoved. (Fiction. 12+)"
A 14-year-old is faced with the hardest decision of his life in this outstanding, sensitive exploration of a topic ripped from the headlines. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WORSE THINGS HAPPEN AT SEA! by Alan Snow
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 9, 2013

"There's foolery aplenty, but this is the sort of sequel that offers more of the same rather than any new twists or developments. (partial cast list) (Fantasy. 11-13)"
More cheese-centric shenanigans take the multispecies cast of Here Be Monsters (2006) far from the town of Ratbridge. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TRUTH ABOUT CATS by Alan Snow
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1996

"But even those who dislike cats may not be in the audience for this one—it is too mild to be amusing. (Picture book. 4-8)"
This companion to How Dogs Really Work (1993) explains that cats originate on Planet Nip, that they are here in a struggle for world domination, etc. The tone is tongue in cheek throughout, but the text itself is not very funny; the endless explanations will bore preschoolers, and older readers can find funnier stuff on their own. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I INVENTED THE MODERN AGE by Richard Snow
Released: May 14, 2013

"Stylistically, Snow mimics the marvelously folksy, protean temperament of his subject, dwelling on Ford's early mechanical inventions rather than his latter problematic prickliness, and everywhere portraying a compelling character."
Evidently fired up by Ford's success story, former American Heritage editor-in-chief Snow (A Measureless Peril: America in the Fight for the Atlantic, the Longest Battle of World War II, 2010, etc.) conveys his interest by delving deeply into the details of Ford's mechanical genius. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 11, 2010

"An accomplished historian with a welcome personal touch."
Former longtime American Heritage editor Snow (Coney Island: A Postcard Journey to the City of Fire, 1983, etc.) examines the Atlantic theater of World War II, where his father fought. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW DOGS REALLY WORK! by Alan Snow
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"De gustibus. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Cutaway cartoons reveal that the Dog is really filled with levers, pistons, tubes, vats, memory banks, sniff motors, and waste disposal plumbing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SWITCH by Carol Snow
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Claire's quick-paced narration comes laced with bolts of sarcasm; the realistic problems blend successfully into a suspenseful, mystical story that will attract fans of both chick-lit and the supernatural. (Fantasy. YA)"
It usually happens to 15-year-old Claire when there's a thunderstorm, and only with someone born under the same moon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THAT'S ALL, FOLKS! by Greg Snow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1992

"Better in concept than execution: Snow's first novel, already bought for the movies, reads as though calculated precisely to take advantage of post-Roger Rabbit special effects and may be more effective on the screen."
A comic debut that makes a transition directly from offensiveness to sentimentality: a vain, greedy, creature of 1980's London finds himself turning into a cartoon until—with the help of an angel—he recovers his humanity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOR by Carol Snow
Released: April 1, 2000

"She is least poetic and most didactic when performing her syntactic legerdemain."
Snow, who lives in San Francisco, won the Book Award from the Poetry Center at San Francisco State University in 1990 for Artist and Model, her first collection of poetry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

1777 by Dean Snow
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 3, 2016

"While the narrative is initially slow, military history lovers will appreciate Snow's explanations of how battles are fought, especially regarding supply lines, geography, and leading characters."
A chronicle of 33 days in Saratoga, New York, in 1777 that turned the tide for the American Revolution. Read full book review >