Search Results: "Barbara Timberlake Russell"


BOOK REVIEW

BLUE LIGHTNING by Barbara Timberlake Russell
FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"The plotting, however, is wobbly and confusing. (Fiction. 10+)"
A novel that aspires to the same spirituality that drove Field of Dreams, equating unfinished affairs in life with an unfinished game of baseball, and making the father-son bond paramount. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Every chapter begins with a quotation from the Bible, lending structure to this intriguing, exciting tale. (Fiction. 12-15)"
Russell (Blue Lightning, 1997, etc.) pens a fantasy with biblical overtones, in which a timid, bookish 14-year-old must save the world from the devil. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAGGIE’S AMERIKAY by Barbara Timberlake Russell
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 4, 2006

"With deft dialogue and well-chosen phrases, Russell enlivens the period, when the poor competed for jobs, death in childhood was more common than anomalous and a vibrant city gave birth to jazz. (historical note) (Picture book. 6-9)"
An Irish immigrant family scrimps to earn its place in New Orleans in 1898. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE REMEMBERING STONE by Barbara Timberlake Russell
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: April 2, 2004

"Ultimately, the whole thing falls flat, despite good intentions. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Dreams become a leitmotif in this story of personal and cultural identity—with some muddled success. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAST LEFT STANDING by Barbara T. Russell
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"More than bibliotherapy, this is an uplifting tale about the resilience and capacity of the human heart. (Fiction. 8-14)"
In this moving first novel, Josh, 13, must struggle through his grief alone after the sudden death of his older brother, Toby. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 8, 2013

"Georgie's story will capture readers' imaginations with the very first sentences and then hold them hostage until the final page is turned. (Historical fiction. 9-12)"
In 1871, in the small town of Placid, Wis., a sister goes missing and a great adventure begins. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 6, 2003

"For women's study courses, this look at a heretofore largely unexplored phenomenon is sure to provide controversial material."
Fifteen instructive essays on the causes and effects of female workers' migration from poor nations to affluent ones. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DIRTY COWBOY by Amy Timberlake
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 8, 2003

"Inspired by an anecdote passed down in the author's family, this cautionary tale should please all young readers with an aversion to soap and water. (Picture book. 7-9)"
Deciding, for obscure reasons, that it's time for a bath, a solitary cowboy discovers that being clean can have unexpected complications in this side-splitting double debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THAT GIRL LUCY MOON by Amy Timberlake
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"As Lucy grows into her new self, redefining both friendships and her relationships with her parents, readers will see, along with Lucy, that change isn't all bad. (Fiction. 9-13)"
Sixth-grader Lucy Moon's life begins to unravel the day her photographer mother sets off on an extended road trip. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Tale of Old Man Fischer by Russell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 16, 2014

"A capably written, genre-bending story filled with creepy-crawlies and refreshingly curious humans."
Neighborhood lore becomes a frightening reality for a young boy who dares to trespass on the property of Old Man Fischer in this debut mystery. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

A MIGHTY IMAGINATION
by Julie Danielson

Barbara DaCosta and Ed Young aren’t new to collaboration. In 2012, she wrote and he illustrated Nighttime Ninja, her debut picture book. Mighty Moby, on shelves in early August, is their second collaboration, and it came to exist in a way not typical for most picture books, what the author calls “an unusual method” and “backward.”

Evidently, Ed Young ...


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