Search Results: "Barton D. Schmitt"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 2011

"An excellent resource that will help all parents rest a little easier at night."
An immensely helpful medical guide that won't just sit on the shelf. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIS MONSTER CANNOT WAIT! by Bethany Barton
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 18, 2013

"For youngsters working on self-control (a school-readiness skill), Stewart does…eventually…learn that good things come to those who wait. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Stewart, from This Monster Needs a Haircut (2012), is going camping for the first time, and he (literally) cannot wait. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIS MONSTER NEEDS A HAIRCUT by Bethany Barton
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 5, 2012

"Neither terrible nor terribly interesting; Elivia Savadier's No Haircut Today! (2005) is a more distilled treatment of the same subject. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Visually energetic but unsophisticated, with pedestrian text, this may be selected more by parents hoping the humor will coax their kids into a haircut than by the kids themselves. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WEE LITTLE WOMAN by Byron Barton
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 30, 1995

The echoes of other versions of this tale gain all the invigorating impact of an original in Barton's capable hands. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SLEEPY SONGBIRD by Suzanne Barton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"This sleepy narrative doesn't ever really wake up. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A small bird named Little Peep wants to join the other birds singing at sunrise, but he discovers that he isn't an early riser. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY HOUSE by Byron Barton
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 12, 2016

"The targeted diaperati will likely be similarly enervated by this bland open house. (Picture book. 1-3)"
A ginger cat introduces young viewers to his personal house and world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GIVE BEES A CHANCE by Bethany Barton
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 25, 2017

"Even the most bee-phobic readers will have a hard time resisting this swarm of humor and fact. (author's note) (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
Following much the same format as in I'm Trying to Love Spiders (2015), Barton makes a strong case for the value of bees. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DINOSAURS, DINOSAURS by Byron Barton
Released: March 10, 1989

"Scientific names and their pronunciations are given on the endpapers."
Using an extremely simple text, the author of several informational books for the very young—on such subjects as wheels, airports, and boats—takes on the animal world with a look at a favorite topic: "A long time ago. . .There were dinosaurs with horns and dinosaurs with spikes." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE AERIALIST by Richard Schmitt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 17, 2000

"A fine debut novel, from a writer who has avoided the usual clichés and produced a work of genuine originality."
A gritty, solidly detailed first novel, set among traveling circuses and their world-weary "artists" and workingmen: the best novel of its kind since Edward Hoagland's Cat Man (1955). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"An accomplished first novel that effectively blends folklore with the evening news."
A novel about one old man's fight against the machinations of city hall. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

APPLEBET STORY by Byron Barton
Released: March 19, 1973

"Well, there is lots of action for those who enjoy following those frenetic visual sequences which Barton borrows from the comics."
In the pop style of his Where's Al (KR 1972) and exhibiting the same partiality for overturned carts and mounting pandemonium, Barton follows an apple (A) which the wind blows (B) off a tree and into a city (C), then down (D) over an outdoor cafe and onto eleven (E) ice cream sundaes whose consequent collapse sends the waiter into a fury (F) and then to the garbage (G). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TESTAMENT OF YVES GUNDRON by Emily Barton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2000

"A commanding and extraordinarily accomplished debut."
A brilliant debut skillfully blends creation myth and folk tale with subtle criticisms of both depersonalized technological advancement and the kind of insularity that breeds and overvalues both tradition and ignorance. Read full book review >