Search Results: "Ben Bova"


BOOK REVIEW

POWERSAT by Ben Bova
Released: Dec. 23, 2004

Plenty of agreeable complications, but the assembly-line cast and situations tag this as just a footnote to an otherwise distinguished series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOONRISE by Ben Bova
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"Despite—or perhaps because of—the hokey family feud, little narrative momentum develops: an intermittently involving, elaborate stage-setter for Bova's projected volume two."
Writer-editor Bova, having tackled Mars (1992), moves closer to home with this near-future family melodrama about nanotechnology and the exploitation of the Moon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ORION AMONG THE STARS by Ben Bova
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"The best entry so far in an evolving and increasingly worthwhile series."
What started out as a series of fantasy/superscience potboilers (Orion and the Conqueror, 1993, etc.) has shown notable improvement of late. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHALLENGES by Ben Bova
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1993

"Worthwhile, especially for the essays and the various indications of Bova's own editorial thought processes—he has been no small influence himself."
Twelve tales and six essays, 1962-92, including three previously unpublished stories, each piece illuminated by an extensive, and often broadly autobiographical, introduction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEAUTY OF LIGHT by Ben Bova
Released: Oct. 3, 1988

"Enjoyable, informative, easy-to-read: accomplished, old-fashioned science writing in the successful Bova mode."
Veteran science writer Bova (Welcome to Moonbase, 1987; etc.) sheds light on light in this entertaining, informal, profusely illustrated study. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WELCOME TO MOONBASE by Ben Bova
Released: Nov. 1, 1987

"Great fun for kiddy astronauts, armchair explorers, and collectors of pseudo-documents."
"Welcome to Moonbase!" Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRIVATEERS by Ben Bova
Released: Oct. 30, 1985

"One of Bova's best, then, and the fans by now will be familiar with his Cold War posture and anti-Russian rhetoric."
Veteran writer-editor Bova (Voyagers, 1981) weighs in with a large, modesdy successful, near-future Message yam, told mostly in flashback. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 3, 1985

"All in all, standard ideas, plotting, and melodrama, along with an un-convincing and poorly developed alien presence: only for Voyagers fans."
At the end of the talky, mechanical Voyagers (1981), readers will recall, astronaut Keith Stoner heroically arranged to freeze himself solid inside an approaching alien spacecraft—alongside a dead alien—in order to force the world powers to mount a rescue operation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STAR PEACE by Ben Bova
Released: Oct. 26, 1984

"From the trappings of technical arguments, Bova shifts to superficial morality plays in the hope that agreement over such control can be established; and on neither score is he particularly convincing."
As a former Omni editorial director and author of science fiction and nonfiction space-science books, Bova can be expected to have an interest in so-called Star Wars defense technology. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MULTIPLE MAN by Ben Bova
Released: May 1, 1976

"It's a slickly plotted jaunt through the upper governmental strata of tomorrow, with enough going on to entertain both the SF hard-core and those who like their thrillers political."
This takes off at a fast clip with President James J. Halliday's arrival in Boston to deliver a speech, and never slows down. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 15, 1975

Bova distinguishes between artistry and craftsmanship; but can his strict rules for characterization, background and conflict be followed without inhibiting the former? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCIENCE-WHO NEEDS IT? by Ben Bova
Released: April 1, 1975

"And as for those others who are taking up the occult: If it is simultaneously likely that they (a) pose a threat to the rule of reason and (b) are open to persuasion by reason, then a serious, point-by-point investigation such as Gallant's Astrology (KR, 1974) should be more convincing."
A ridiculously simplistic apology for science and technology. Read full book review >