Search Results: "Ben Hamper"


BOOK REVIEW

RIVETHEAD by Ben Hamper
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 13, 1991

"Rivethead indeed."
Based on his ``Rivethead'' column that has appeared in Midwest newspapers as well as in Mother Jones, here is Hamper's tortured description of his wretched career as a General Motors worker in the factories of Flint, Michigan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE ROBOT by Ben Hatke
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Girl power at its best. A sure winner! (Graphic novel. 3-12)"
Possibilities abound for a small, brown-skinned girl with time, a tool belt, and a penchant for urban adventure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SWORDS by Ben Boos
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Armchair warriors, junior members of the Society for Creative Anachronism and budding graphic artists will be riveted. (bibliography) (Nonfiction. 9-16)"
An unabashed browsing item, this big, square album is chock-full of digitally painted images of knives and swords, laid out in generic arrays with every nick, notch, decorative motif and gleaming highlight rendered in lovingly realistic detail. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MIGHTY JACK by Ben Hatke
Kirkus Star
by Ben Hatke, illustrated by Ben Hatke
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"Very mighty indeed. (Graphic fantasy. 7-13)"
A comic-book riff on the classic tale of "Jack and the Beanstalk," in which an impoverished young boy learns that his new garden has a mind of its own. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FISHING BROTHERS GRUFF by Ben Galbraith
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2008

"Illustrated with a garish tangle of photo-manipulated found objects, scowling painted figures and harvested fish—plus the occasional die-cut hole—this import will be best directed toward readers who need their lessons bludgeoned home. (Picture book. 7-9)"
Taking the familiar folk tale as his model but revising the ending considerably, Galbraith fashions a blunt cautionary tale aimed at heedless degraders of the environment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IT CAME IN THE MAIL by Ben Clanton
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 21, 2016

"Surprisingly, no snails included. Still, more fun than bills and junk mail. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Sending mail to…a mailbox? Clever! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOO! by Ben Newman
by Ben Newman, illustrated by Ben Newman
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 11, 2017

"A natural as a high-volume storytime ice breaker or lagniappe. (Picture book. 4-6)"
Everyone's afraid of something. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMETHING EXTRAORDINARY by Ben Clanton
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 16, 2015

"The slowly dawning message will elicit excitement about spring, wishing, and the ability to decode a narrative. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Bored with the familiar, this young daydreamer imagines how life could be different. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JULIA'S HOUSE FOR LOST CREATURES by Ben Hatke
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 2, 2014

"Readers will want to move right in. (Picture book. 4-7)"
When a little girl opens her house to "lost creatures," chaos reigns until she sets rules for harmonious coexistence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO FLUNG DUNG? by Ben Redlich
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2013

"A heaping flop, even for children who fall on this sort of humor and devour it with relish. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Redlich dumps off a single-joke solo debut in which the simian victim of a fecal prank goes around repeating the titular enquiry over and over. And over. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ZITA THE SPACEGIRL by Ben Hatke
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

"Be prepared to blast off; this debut is truly out of this world. (Graphic science fiction. 9-12)"
A headstrong young girl makes a hasty decision and finds herself in a galaxy far, far away in this graphic-novel shining star. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THAT PESKY TOASTER! by Ben Hillman
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 15, 1995

"A minor understanding of astrophysics is required, but for readers in the know, the book pays back in spades. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Goldie's toaster may look like a cross between an Electrolux and a bull terrier, but there's a whole lot more than heat in those coils. Read full book review >