Search Results: "Ben Tarnoff"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 24, 2014

"It may be, as Tarnoff asserts, that these writers spent the best years of their lives in California, but only Twain, living in New York and Connecticut, left a lasting literary legacy."
Four ambitious writers star in this literary history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 14, 2004

"Sure to arouse envy in those, now gray, who neither tripped at home nor took the disorienting trip to the Orient: a facile, vivid, novelistic yarn."
A self-styled seeker of Truth sends postcards from his stoned journey a generation ago. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FISHING BROTHERS GRUFF by Ben Galbraith
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2008

"Illustrated with a garish tangle of photo-manipulated found objects, scowling painted figures and harvested fish—plus the occasional die-cut hole—this import will be best directed toward readers who need their lessons bludgeoned home. (Picture book. 7-9)"
Taking the familiar folk tale as his model but revising the ending considerably, Galbraith fashions a blunt cautionary tale aimed at heedless degraders of the environment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IT CAME IN THE MAIL by Ben Clanton
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 21, 2016

"Surprisingly, no snails included. Still, more fun than bills and junk mail. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Sending mail to…a mailbox? Clever! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOO! by Ben Newman
by Ben Newman, illustrated by Ben Newman
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 11, 2017

"A natural as a high-volume storytime ice breaker or lagniappe. (Picture book. 4-6)"
Everyone's afraid of something. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HUG! by Ben Mantle
by Ben Mantle, illustrated by Ben Mantle
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2013

"While the covers of both titles suggest lots of interaction, the pages within fail to deliver the goods. (Board book. 18 mos.-3)"
An ode to various kinds of hugs as enacted by various animals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TABLE SETS ITSELF by Ben Clanton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2013

"Clanton makes chores a delight! (Picture book. 4-8)"
A young girl receives a new responsibility, but when the prized task becomes a boring duty, she and her tableware friends must find a way to keep things fresh and funny in this winning tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 4, 2012

"Imaginative and utterly bewitching. (Graphic science fiction. 9-12)"
Lovable Zita returns in a charmingly dashing interplanetary adventure to save yet another doomed planet from impending peril. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GREAT-UNCLE ALFRED FORGETS by Ben Shecter
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 29, 1996

"They fairly radiate with the affection between these two characters as they struggle to communicate. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A fragmentary conversation between Emily and Great-Uncle Alfred, who is increasingly forgetful; his questions and statements are sometimes funny, sometimes lyrical, sometimes philosophical, and sometimes saggy—the dialogue is a little too realistic in its stops and starts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROT, THE CUTEST IN THE WORLD! by Ben Clanton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 19, 2017

"The kitten has an argument, but readers would be hard put to find a decomposing spud with a more winning personality. (Picture book. 6-8)"
A "mutant potato" with mottled skin and mismatched eyes enters a cuteness contest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CARDBOARD VALISE by Ben Katchor
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Feb. 15, 2011

"A parallel dimension that readers might find creatively charged or thematically exhausting."
The book-length publication of the acclaimed visual artist's weekly strips defies narrative convention as a graphic novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMETHING EXTRAORDINARY by Ben Clanton
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 16, 2015

"The slowly dawning message will elicit excitement about spring, wishing, and the ability to decode a narrative. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Bored with the familiar, this young daydreamer imagines how life could be different. Read full book review >