Search Results: "Ben Towle"


BOOK REVIEW

AMELIA EARHART by Sarah Stewart Taylor
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Feb. 2, 2010

"Like Earhart herself, this book ought to soar exuberantly into the hearts of its readers. (Graphic historical fiction. 9-12)"
The Center of Cartoon Studies, producer of the critically lauded graphic biographies of Harry Houdini, Satchel Paige and Henry David Thoreau, adheres to the same winning formula with this charmer about famed aviator Amelia Earhart. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE REAL McCOY by Wendy Towle
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"With nothing else available on McCoy at this level, this will be useful indeed. (Biography/Picture book. 5-9)"
Concluding a commendable introduction explaining the possibly legendary origins of the eponymous expression in the prolific inventor's most successful device—an ``automatic oil cup, which eventually became standard equipment on most locomotives''—Towle states ``The story of Elijah McCoy's life presented here reflects a composite of existing information we have been able to authenticate.'' Son of former slaves, McCoy was raised in Canada, studied engineering in Scotland, then settled in Michigan, where he invented the oil cup while working as a railroad fireman (discrimination prevented employment more appropriate to his talents); he went on to patent many other inventions, including homely devices like the first portable ironing board and a lawn sprinkler, and to start his own company. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

JAMES PARKS AND BEN COSTA
by Alex Heimbach

“A skeleton and a slime walk into a bar…” That may sound like the wind up to a very nerdy joke, but it’s actually the set up for a scene in James Parks and Ben Costa’s new YA graphic novel, Rickety Stitch and the Gelatinous Goo: The Road to Epoli, which, to be fair, is full of very nerdy — ...


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BOOK REVIEW

THE FISHING BROTHERS GRUFF by Ben Galbraith
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2008

"Illustrated with a garish tangle of photo-manipulated found objects, scowling painted figures and harvested fish—plus the occasional die-cut hole—this import will be best directed toward readers who need their lessons bludgeoned home. (Picture book. 7-9)"
Taking the familiar folk tale as his model but revising the ending considerably, Galbraith fashions a blunt cautionary tale aimed at heedless degraders of the environment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IT CAME IN THE MAIL by Ben Clanton
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 21, 2016

"Surprisingly, no snails included. Still, more fun than bills and junk mail. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Sending mail to…a mailbox? Clever! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOO! by Ben Newman
by Ben Newman, illustrated by Ben Newman
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 11, 2017

"A natural as a high-volume storytime ice breaker or lagniappe. (Picture book. 4-6)"
Everyone's afraid of something. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HUG! by Ben Mantle
by Ben Mantle, illustrated by Ben Mantle
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2013

"While the covers of both titles suggest lots of interaction, the pages within fail to deliver the goods. (Board book. 18 mos.-3)"
An ode to various kinds of hugs as enacted by various animals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TABLE SETS ITSELF by Ben Clanton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2013

"Clanton makes chores a delight! (Picture book. 4-8)"
A young girl receives a new responsibility, but when the prized task becomes a boring duty, she and her tableware friends must find a way to keep things fresh and funny in this winning tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 4, 2012

"Imaginative and utterly bewitching. (Graphic science fiction. 9-12)"
Lovable Zita returns in a charmingly dashing interplanetary adventure to save yet another doomed planet from impending peril. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GREAT-UNCLE ALFRED FORGETS by Ben Shecter
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 29, 1996

"They fairly radiate with the affection between these two characters as they struggle to communicate. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A fragmentary conversation between Emily and Great-Uncle Alfred, who is increasingly forgetful; his questions and statements are sometimes funny, sometimes lyrical, sometimes philosophical, and sometimes saggy—the dialogue is a little too realistic in its stops and starts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROT, THE CUTEST IN THE WORLD! by Ben Clanton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 19, 2017

"The kitten has an argument, but readers would be hard put to find a decomposing spud with a more winning personality. (Picture book. 6-8)"
A "mutant potato" with mottled skin and mismatched eyes enters a cuteness contest. Read full book review >