Search Results: "Bennie Lee Sinclair"


BOOK REVIEW

THE LYNCHING by Bennie Lee Sinclair
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

"An accomplished debut."
Justyn Jones, an aide to Governor Marston of South Carolina, and Thomas Levity, a handsome black teacher from California, are seatmates on a plane to the town of Green Hills, where Justyn lives with realtor husband Frank. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Tortoise & the Hare by Katelyn Sinclair
Released: May 2, 2016

"A well-crafted, charming read-aloud version of a famous tale about the importance of perseverance."
A retelling of Aesop's animal fable that features unusual rhythms. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

SOME SUNNY READING FOR A STRANGE SPRING
by Bobbi Dumas

Is spring a little wiggy for you this year? In Wisconsin, it really can’t figure out what it wants to do. A week or so ago it was a sunny eighty degrees and now it’s cool and rainy, hovering around fifty. Thankfully there are so many bright books releasing these days that we can find sun in their pages, if ...


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BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 24, 2012

"Loquacious, raving and madly provocative."
The nimble London-based author offers a loose-limbed set of disgruntled observations on the massively disruptive development that became the 2012 Olympic Village. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GNOMOBILE by Upton Sinclair
Released: Sept. 8, 1936

"It's the kind of spoofing adults like better than children."
A fairy tale, with a mildly apparent lesson in tree conservation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 1, 2002

"Sinclair's eccentric style works best when taken in small doses—and with the supplement of a map. (8 pages color illustrations, not seen)"
Walking tour of the neighborhoods and communities that border London's M25 highway: amusing and evocative, but bewildering to those not familiar with the territory. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CO-OP by Upton Sinclair
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 2, 1936

"Political views color the story and emotional phases are inevitable, though the emphasis is on reasoning rather than on party and the line is sharply drawn between socialism and communism."
This story does not follow exactly the thread indicated by the title. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RETURN OF LANNY BUDD by Upton Sinclair
Released: April 20, 1953

"But somehow, the plot seems synthetic, the development contrived, and the injection of modern socialism and a new approach to the peace movement arbitrary."
Let's put the cards on the table and confess that it was with something of relief that I accepted O Shepherd, Speak! as the end of Lanny Budd, and that his "return" was unwelcome news. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"A crude but vivid account of life beyond the bounds of decency."
In 1965 Sinclair killed a store clerk during a bungled robbery. He was subsequently imprisoned in what he describes as "America's worst prison system"—and this autobiographical account supports that description. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DRAGON HARVEST by Upton Sinclair
Released: June 8, 1945

"My humph on the enormous success of this series (this is, I think, the sixth) is that Sinclair tells a fast paced story which has a background of known facts and of backstairs gossip of the rich and famous."
Predictable — with the big following the Lanny Budd saga has secured, for this again is dependable contemporary adventure, a thriller written against the headlines, with plausible (sometimes) footnotes to history in the contribution such a character as Lanny Budd might be making. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Spooky Things by Katelyn Sinclair
Released: Aug. 30, 2015

"There are plenty of Halloween titles out there, but for families looking to read a no-scare celebration of the season, Sinclair's comfortable rhymes and kooky pictures are an excellent choice."
Sinclair's (The Three Little Pigs, 2014) charmingly child-friendly rhyming ode hails spooky (but never scary) monsters.Read full book review >