Search Results: "Bernard Bailyn"


BOOK REVIEW

SOMETIMES AN ART by Bernard Bailyn
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 30, 2015

"Informing all of these graceful, authoritative essays is the mind of a humanist whose project is to reanimate 'a hitherto unglimpsed world.'"
A Pulitzer Prize-winning historian considers the "unsuspected complexities" of recovering the past. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 15, 2003

"Bailyn's distinctive voice, as level-headed and acute as ever, works as both a stimulant and a balm, wrapped in an umbra of intellectual integrity. (65 illustrations, 4 pages of color)"
A two-time Pulitzer-winner takes to the essay form again (Faces of Revolution, 1990) as he endeavors to portray the likes of Jefferson, Adams, and Franklin in all their ambiguities, inconsistencies, and ability to think freely. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 7, 2012

"Popular histories often gentrify these early events, but Bailyn's gripping, detailed, often squirm-inducing account makes it abundantly clear how ungenteel they actually were."
Continuing his magisterial, multivolume history of North American colonization, two-time Pulitzer winner Bailyn (To Begin the World Anew: The Genius and Ambiguities of the American Founders, 2003, etc.) recounts the surprisingly brutal early steps. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EVIE AND MARGIE by Bernard Waber
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 27, 2003

"Fans of Lyle might wonder why with tears as the motif, Waber didn't go for the innuendo and make the characters crocodiles? (Picture book. 4-8)"
Evie and Margie are best friends; they do everything together, even dreaming of becoming actors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEARSIE BEAR AND THE SURPRISE SLEEPOVER PARTY by Bernard Waber
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"The reading of the accumulated names every time the animals settle down results in a book that may be too raucous for bedtime, but ideal for story hours. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A humorous cumulative tale that makes a great read-aloud for the very young. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BENEATH THE STONE by Bernard Wolf
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"Map; pronunciation guide; note about the Zapotecs. (Nonfiction. 5-9)"
In appealing, handsomely composed color photos and a brief but informatative text, a portrait of Leodegario Vicente Golan Ruiz (``Leo'') and his large family, whose tapetes (rugs or hangings) are ``famous throughout Mexico.'' At six, Leo is already a weaver of ``small tapetes in simple patterns.'' Wolf details his typical day (including school), tells how his family celebrates ``The Days of the Dead'' and other holidays, and depicts visits to the ancient capital of the Zapotecs (their ``impressive culture'' was one of several that were flourishing when the Spaniards arrived in A.D. 1519) and to a market (Leo's work sells quickly, but the low price two of his mother's tapetes bring is matter of concern to these hardworking people). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AFTERSHOCK by Bernard Ashley
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 2011

"Both Makis and his mother show growth and strength under difficult circumstances, and children will be caught by the many strands in this brief but absorbing tale. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Football (soccer to Americans), his father's mandolin and his concern for his widowed mother carry Makis through an earthquake on the Greek island of Kefalonia to a new life in Camden Town in London. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 17, 1992

"Cornwen, one of the great naval writers of this era, finds a way to get his intrepid army hero to sea for much of the story—without in the least compromising the high standards of this first-rate series."
The hero of Cornwell's Sharpe series (Sharpe's Revenge, etc.) reluctantly abandons his Norman hearth and home to search for an old friend gone missing in revolutionary Chile. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VAGABOND by Bernard Cornwell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2002

"Historically accurate and huge fun. Vintage Cornwell."
Continuing the series that began with The Archer's Tale (2001), adventure master Cornwell throws his lusty young hero Thomas of Hookton up against both the French and the Inquisition. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE AMBIGUITY OF VIRTUE by Bernard Wasserstein
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 17, 2014

"A scholarly, thoroughly documented work that elucidates historical issues and explores moral ones."
Was she a heroine or collaborator, a saint or sinner? How should we view Gertrude van Tijn (1891-1974), a woman tasked with saving Jews from the Nazi's gas chambers? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Not a major contribution to the debate, then, but a fine introduction, ultimately original and engagingly written throughout."
Pornography, contends anthropologist Arcand (UniversitÇ Laval, QuÇbec), marks a choice in favor of a minimalist, uncommitted life purged as far as possible of appetites: the survivalist lifestyle of the anteater rather than that of the fast-living, pleasure-seeking jaguar. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHARPE’S ESCAPE by Bernard Cornwell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2004

"Another good one."
Cornwell's excellent long-running Sharpe series (Sharpe's Havoc, 2003, etc.) takes the soldiers' soldier to real-life battles around Bussaco and Coimbra, Portugal. Read full book review >