Search Results: "Bernard Bailyn"


BOOK REVIEW

SOMETIMES AN ART by Bernard Bailyn
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 30, 2015

"Informing all of these graceful, authoritative essays is the mind of a humanist whose project is to reanimate 'a hitherto unglimpsed world.'"
A Pulitzer Prize-winning historian considers the "unsuspected complexities" of recovering the past. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 15, 2003

"Bailyn's distinctive voice, as level-headed and acute as ever, works as both a stimulant and a balm, wrapped in an umbra of intellectual integrity. (65 illustrations, 4 pages of color)"
A two-time Pulitzer-winner takes to the essay form again (Faces of Revolution, 1990) as he endeavors to portray the likes of Jefferson, Adams, and Franklin in all their ambiguities, inconsistencies, and ability to think freely. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 7, 2012

"Popular histories often gentrify these early events, but Bailyn's gripping, detailed, often squirm-inducing account makes it abundantly clear how ungenteel they actually were."
Continuing his magisterial, multivolume history of North American colonization, two-time Pulitzer winner Bailyn (To Begin the World Anew: The Genius and Ambiguities of the American Founders, 2003, etc.) recounts the surprisingly brutal early steps. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EVIE AND MARGIE by Bernard Waber
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 27, 2003

"Fans of Lyle might wonder why with tears as the motif, Waber didn't go for the innuendo and make the characters crocodiles? (Picture book. 4-8)"
Evie and Margie are best friends; they do everything together, even dreaming of becoming actors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEARSIE BEAR AND THE SURPRISE SLEEPOVER PARTY by Bernard Waber
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"The reading of the accumulated names every time the animals settle down results in a book that may be too raucous for bedtime, but ideal for story hours. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A humorous cumulative tale that makes a great read-aloud for the very young. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BENEATH THE STONE by Bernard Wolf
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"Map; pronunciation guide; note about the Zapotecs. (Nonfiction. 5-9)"
In appealing, handsomely composed color photos and a brief but informatative text, a portrait of Leodegario Vicente Golan Ruiz (``Leo'') and his large family, whose tapetes (rugs or hangings) are ``famous throughout Mexico.'' At six, Leo is already a weaver of ``small tapetes in simple patterns.'' Wolf details his typical day (including school), tells how his family celebrates ``The Days of the Dead'' and other holidays, and depicts visits to the ancient capital of the Zapotecs (their ``impressive culture'' was one of several that were flourishing when the Spaniards arrived in A.D. 1519) and to a market (Leo's work sells quickly, but the low price two of his mother's tapetes bring is matter of concern to these hardworking people). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AFTERSHOCK by Bernard Ashley
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 2011

"Both Makis and his mother show growth and strength under difficult circumstances, and children will be caught by the many strands in this brief but absorbing tale. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Football (soccer to Americans), his father's mandolin and his concern for his widowed mother carry Makis through an earthquake on the Greek island of Kefalonia to a new life in Camden Town in London. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"Still, despite its tantalizing brevity, an elegant book."
In three essays based on lectures, Lewis provides an engaging overview of the cultural and political clash between Christian Europe and the Islamic world from the late 15th to the early 19th centuries. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GENESIS by Bernard Beckett
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 20, 2009

"A cannily constructed portrait of a global worst-case scenario."
Dystopian vision of a future Earth almost wholly engulfed by environmental catastrophe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A YEAR OF RHYMES by Bernard Cooper
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Beautifully written and memorable—if not as riveting or powerful as one might hope."
A sweet, nostalgic first novel by essayist Cooper (Maps to Anywhere, 1991) delineating the riddles that define Burt Zerkin's 11th year—as Burt discovers his sexual longing for boys and men and faces the death of an older brother from leukemia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHARPE'S RIFLES by Bernard Cornwell
Released: Sept. 8, 1988

"Another good Sharpe."
The Sharpe series (Sharpe's Regiment, Sharpe's Siege, etc.) reverts to 1809 and Sharpe's early days as an officer in French-occupied Spain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Killing Juggernaut by Jared Bernard
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 25, 2015

"Despite an overall lack of focus, Bernard's tale still manages to retain a mournful, prophetic power."
It's the end of the world as we know it, and nobody feels fine in Bernard's debut portrayal of humanity's end. Read full book review >