Search Results: "Bernard Corbett"


BOOK REVIEW

BERNARD SHAW by Sally Peters
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1996

"Peters offers a rhetorically overloaded version of Shaw's life and work. (29 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
A tendentious, trendy reading of Shaw, with an entirely speculative theory of secret homosexuality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"Holroyd keeps a lightly even voice throughout so that every word Shaw utters—and he is clearly the greatest wit in the English language—glistens with intelligence against his fading hopes for humanity. (Thirty-two pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Triumphant closing of Holroyd's massive life of George Bernard Shaw (1856-1951), begun with The Search for Love (1988) and The Pursuit of Power (1989)—a work 15 years in the writing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2004

"If only all centuries-old conflicts were this gentlemanly. (8-page b&w photo insert, not seen)"
A cheering celebration of one of football's great rivalries, by two Boston-area sportswriters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLUE BERNARD by Nathalie Tousnakhoff
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 19, 2013

"Bernard's story alone is lovely to look at with too few shades between its primary hues. (iPad storybook app. 4-8)"
The second in an app series called Colorful World, this follow-up to Zoe's Green Planet (2013) follows Bernard, who is "blue from head to toe" on an all-pink planet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BERNARD WANTS A BABY by Joan Elizabeth Goodman
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2004

"It's nothing new, but those who enjoy Bernard will sympathize with this easy squeeze-of-the-hand for the youngest with new-sibling jitters, reinforced by the idyllic settings and touches of exotica delivered by Catalano's pastels. (Picture book. 2-5)"
The little elephant last seen in another familiar trial (Bernard Goes to School, 2001) has his life changed once again, this time in a big way. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BERNARD GOES TO SCHOOL by Joan Elizabeth Goodman
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"Featuring purple, green, and gold elephants, Catalano's pastels are as soft as the outcome of the story, with Bernard discovering that a friendly face and a new chum go a long way toward taking the dismay out of the new. (Picture book. 2-5)"
The first day of preschool can give even an elephant a case of the shim-shams, as Goodman's little pachyderm learns. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BERNARD THE ANGRY ROOSTER by Mary Wormell
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 18, 2001

"2000, etc.) will be drawn to this—and will agree that there's a bit of Bernard in everyone. (Picture book. 4-6)"
What has gotten Bernard's shorts in a twist? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRANCES AND BERNARD by Carlene Bauer
Released: Feb. 5, 2013

"Disappointing."
Debut novelist Bauer pens an epistolary novel whose protagonists lead insular, self-absorbed and very dull lives. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STOP SNORING, BERNARD! by Zachariah OHora
ANIMALS
Released: April 12, 2011

"An artist to watch. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Bernard has a problem: His persistent snoring keeps the other otters awake. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NO MORE KISSES FOR BERNARD! by Niki Daly
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2012

"An amusing look at a childhood dilemma, nicely resolved. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Four squeaky, sticky, sneaky and smoochy aunts are too, too much for birthday boy Bernard. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 24, 1983

"A solid sampling of Malamud's short-story art, with a short author's introduction—the same piece that recently appeared in the New York Times Book Review."
It has been ten years since Malamud's last story-collection—and here, instead of a brand-new batch of tales, is an agreeable enough substitute: the author's own choice of 25 stories, almost all of them from his previously published collections. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 26, 2013

"The Stones' dog-eared story is better told in a dozen other accounts."
A numbingly familiar look back at the Stones' 50-year career. Read full book review >