Search Results: "Bernard Cornwell"


BOOK REVIEW

BERNARD SHAW by Sally Peters
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1996

"Peters offers a rhetorically overloaded version of Shaw's life and work. (29 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
A tendentious, trendy reading of Shaw, with an entirely speculative theory of secret homosexuality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WATERLOO by Bernard Cornwell
NON-FICTION
Released: May 5, 2015

"Despite a little confusion regarding the movements of divisions and brigades, this is a fascinating, detailed, and generously illustrated description of the battle that changed the fate of 19th-century Europe."
In his first nonfiction book, acclaimed historical novelist Cornwell (The Empty Throne, 2015, etc.) employs his storytelling skills to bring military history out of the textbook.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HERETIC by Bernard Cornwell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 7, 2003

"The usual Cornwell bull's-eye."
Beset by the plague and those hellacious Dominican inquisitors, the sure-shot hero of Cornwell's Archer series (Vagabond, 2002, etc.) continues his eventful search for the Holy Grail. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHARPE’S HAVOC by Bernard Cornwell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2003

"The best stuff."
Isolated but far from impotent, Sharpe and his trusty riflemen hold off vast Napoleonic forces in the Portuguese wine country. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GALLOWS THIEF by Bernard Cornwell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 5, 2002

"Standard Cornwell, this time with enough effluvial smells to make a bloodhound hold its breath."
A washed-ashore Cape Codder for the past 20 years, Cornwell has published 18 Richard Sharpe British historicals about soldiering during the Napoleonic Wars (Sharpe's Triumph, 2002), nearly a dozen of which have been seen on PBS. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHARPE’S FORTRESS by Bernard Cornwell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2000

"Fabulous stuff."
Cape Cod resident Cornwell returns to his Napoleonic Wars series about Her Majesty's rifleman Richard Sharpe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 24, 1995

"This time, Sharpe's new print appearance coincides with Masterpiece Theatre's adaptation of three previous books in the series."
Despite clashes with his own superiors as well as with French foes, the durable British hero of Cornwell's splendid series (Sharpe's Devil, 1992, etc.) soldiers on during a bloody turning-point campaign in the Peninsular War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHARPE'S REVENGE by Bernard Cornwell
Released: May 18, 1989

"A concluding note broadly implies a sequel at Waterloo."
The peace of 1814 ends the Peninsular Wars with Napoleon's exile to Elba, but doesn't give a moment's rest to Major Richard Sharpe (Sharpe's Eagle, Sharpe's Regiment, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHARPE'S ENEMY by Bernard Cornwell
Released: March 1, 1983

"Some anachronistic repartee, some excessively grisly torture—but, as before, Cornwell manages to add spice and tension to the more standard barrage of tactics, musketry, and explosions."
Who is Sharpe's enemy? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHARPE'S COMPANY by Bernard Cornwell
Released: June 8, 1982

"Like previous installments: gory, lively, reasonably authentic."
Third novel in the Richard Sharpe saga of the Peninsular War, covering January through April 1812 and the siege of Badajoz. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FLAME BEARER by Bernard Cornwell
Released: Nov. 29, 2016

"No lit-fic pretensions here: historical fiction rendered, with little expansion, via battles and royal intrigue and portraits of day-to-day life circa 1000 B.C.E."
Cornwell (Warriors of the Storm, 2016, etc.) draws another rollicking Saxon tale from the period when "the scepter'd isle," soon to be "Englaland," was plagued by Norse and Dane raiders. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SWORD SONG by Bernard Cornwell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2008

"Consistently fascinating."
The latest installment of Cornwell's vastly entertaining and slyly wise saga of life in ninth-century Britain sees the dyspeptic King Alfred's very young daughter married off to a brute who fancies himself a future monarch. Read full book review >