Search Results: "Bernard Lewis"


BOOK REVIEW

LEWIS by A. Barsell Carlyle
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 23, 2009

"An enjoyable beach read for men, but suspense lags until the final pages."
A debut novel of men's fiction/suspense. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BERNARD SHAW by Sally Peters
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1996

"Peters offers a rhetorically overloaded version of Shaw's life and work. (29 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
A tendentious, trendy reading of Shaw, with an entirely speculative theory of secret homosexuality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"Holroyd keeps a lightly even voice throughout so that every word Shaw utters—and he is clearly the greatest wit in the English language—glistens with intelligence against his fading hopes for humanity. (Thirty-two pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Triumphant closing of Holroyd's massive life of George Bernard Shaw (1856-1951), begun with The Search for Love (1988) and The Pursuit of Power (1989)—a work 15 years in the writing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLUE BERNARD by Nathalie Tousnakhoff
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 19, 2013

"Bernard's story alone is lovely to look at with too few shades between its primary hues. (iPad storybook app. 4-8)"
The second in an app series called Colorful World, this follow-up to Zoe's Green Planet (2013) follows Bernard, who is "blue from head to toe" on an all-pink planet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 9, 1975

"Unlike E.H. Cart or R.G. Collingwood, Lewis doesn't venture into broad issues of historical theory or epistemology; he stays firmly on the path of common sense illuminated by uncommon knowledge."
Lewis, a member of Princeton's Near Eastern Studies Department and one of the great scholars of Semitic history, demonstrates that the best elementary generalizations about a subject are provided by the most deeply learned. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

C.S. LEWIS by Michael White
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"A readable, balanced portrait of a great humanist."
Prolific English biographer White (Leonardo, 2000, etc.) delineates in lively fashion the less than saintly life of the Christian apologist, children's author, Luddite, and fuddy-duddy Oxford don. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 8, 1997

"A charming if terse summary of the journey; readers wanting a detailed history should look elsewhere. (First printing of 100,000; Literary Guild main selection)"
Duncan's second book on the Lewis and Clark expedition (Out West, 1987) is the companion volume to the newest documentary by Burns, scheduled to air on public television stations in early November. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 12, 1995

"Cohen sees Dodgson finally as a talented, upright, melancholy figure, but does not fully integrate Carroll into this protean man. (135 illustrations, not seen)"
Cohen, the editor of Carroll's herculean correspondence, succeeds with the man's Victorian character—both the academic and the eccentric elements—but misses the point of Carroll's pointless nonsense. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MULTIPLE IDENTITIES OF THE MIDDLE EAST by Bernard Lewis
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 20, 1999

"A provocative exploration into the Middle Eastern psyche with both cultural and political significance."
An enlightening, if occasionally repetitive, study of the uniquely complex notion of identity in the Middle East. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BERNARD WANTS A BABY by Joan Elizabeth Goodman
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2004

"It's nothing new, but those who enjoy Bernard will sympathize with this easy squeeze-of-the-hand for the youngest with new-sibling jitters, reinforced by the idyllic settings and touches of exotica delivered by Catalano's pastels. (Picture book. 2-5)"
The little elephant last seen in another familiar trial (Bernard Goes to School, 2001) has his life changed once again, this time in a big way. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BERNARD GOES TO SCHOOL by Joan Elizabeth Goodman
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"Featuring purple, green, and gold elephants, Catalano's pastels are as soft as the outcome of the story, with Bernard discovering that a friendly face and a new chum go a long way toward taking the dismay out of the new. (Picture book. 2-5)"
The first day of preschool can give even an elephant a case of the shim-shams, as Goodman's little pachyderm learns. Read full book review >