Search Results: "Bernice Eisenstein"


BOOK REVIEW

I WAS A CHILD OF HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS by Bernice Eisenstein
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 17, 2006

"Like Art Spiegelman's Maus, with which it is likely to be compared (and hold up well in the bargain), Eisenstein's memoir is an ultimately hopeful act, enshrining ordinary people so that they will not be forgotten, wrinkles and warts and secrets and all."
String Hebrew-language chicken tags together, and you'll discover that the word "kosher" spells "Jew" sideways. So this brilliantly conceived child's-eye view of the Shoah generation reveals—to name just one mystery unraveled. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SERGEI EISENSTEIN by Ronald Bergan
NON-FICTION
Released: April 27, 1999

"An accessible, smart chronicle of a creative genius attempting to follow art and country. (36 b&w photos, not seen)"
This biography limns a man driven by ideas but thwarted by oppression from all fronts—family, business, and government. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AUNT BERNICE by Jack Gantos
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1978

"Aunt Bernice's consistent coltish spirits could indeed be trying; but with her splashy patterns, outrageous perspective, exhuberant asides, and even a loving, Matisse-y hug at the end, Rubel does her to a frazzle."
If neither Aunt Bernice nor her wonderful (if Booth-like) dog Rex can yet face up to Gantos and Rubel's inspired red cat, still for the first time since Rotten Ralph Gantos' story provides a suitable outlet for Rubel's manic energy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BERNICE GETS CARRIED AWAY by Hannah E. Harrison
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 14, 2015

"While the final twist is a bit heavy-handed, overall, the emotional honesty, simple, understated text, and entertaining visual humor combine to create an appealing take on a problem that occasionally plagues us all, whether child, adult, or grumpy cat. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A series of minor disappointments leads Bernice to make a greedy grab at a friend's birthday party which in turn spurs an unexpected change of heart. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILD OF THE HEART by Bernice Willms
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 15, 2013

"A taut and involving small-town tale of murder and loyalty from a promising new author."
A teenager finds her beliefs about her problematic uncle severely challenged. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GOLD WATCH by Bernice Myers
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 16, 1991

"The happy ending (new job, bike returned) may be less familiar to some children than the hard times, but it's satisfying; the cartoon-style illustrations are lively and expressive. (Picture book. 4-8)"
In a pared-down style with the nuances of real experience, a mini-novel: After Joey's Dad loses his job, he pawns his watch. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NINE LIVES by Bernice Rubens
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 2004

"A killer so robotic that he seems sedated keeps a rather classically constructed, and very British, tale from being much more than an exercise in style."
There's a killer on the loose in England, and no psychotherapist is safe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SOLITARY GRIEF by Bernice Rubens
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"A teeth-grinding, chilling tale of human nastiness—in guises that are both horrible and most commonplace."
Reading a Rubens novel (Mate in Three, Our Father, Sat on Edge—all 1987) requires an iron-nerved distance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SERGEANTS’ TALE by Bernice Rubens
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2005

"With her usual expert precision and swiftly assured strokes, Rubens cuts away the dross and leaves us with baroque emotions conveyed in a fine-tuned minimalism. Nerve-racking."
Two British soldiers—one Jewish—are twisted up in espionage in British Palestine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ABBY ALDRICH ROCKEFELLER by Bernice Kert
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A splendidly intelligent, very readable portrait of a woman who was as wise in the rearing of her family as in the spending of her great wealth. (Forty b&w photos—not seen)"
Well-wrought life of the woman who was not only—in the words of a New York Times editorial published on the occasion of her death, in 1948 at age 73—``the spirit that held [the Rockefellers] together'' but whose role in the handling of the family wealth was ``a fortunate thing for society, for this country, and for the world.'' Kert (The Hemingway Women, 1983), despite all her exhaustive research, happily lets her subject retain all of her formidable vitality and independence—characteristics that her husband, the psychologically repressed and romantic loner John D. Rockefeller, Jr., both admired and occasionally sought to curtail. Read full book review >