Search Results: "Bert Kreischer"


BOOK REVIEW

LIFE OF THE PARTY by Bert Kreischer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 27, 2014

"The market for this sophomoric book likely consists of men who don't read many others."
Another comedian extends his brand to the printed page. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AND SO THEY BUILD by Bert Kitchen
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

An artist known for his elegant sense of design and meticulous paintings (Animal Alphabet, 1984, ALA Notable) depicts 12 animal-built structures: Australia's mallee fowl make self- warming nests of composting vegetable matter covered with sand, controlling the temperature until their eggs hatch; Africa's Cubeterme termites build columns of soil, riddled with chambers for different functions and topped with an umbrella-like cap to ``divert torrential rain''; a pregnant harvest mouse weaves a nest of still-rooted grasses, so that the nest continues to rise to greater safety. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN HUNGER CALLS by Bert Kitchen
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"He just portrays animals doing what they do to survive, and he does it in elegant detail. (Nonfiction/Picture book. 4+)"
In his third book on animal behavior, author/illustrator Kitchen (Somewhere Today, 1992, etc.) highlights the eating habits of 12 animal predators. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMEWHERE TODAY by Bert Kitchen
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Not for reference, but to use as a reminder of creation's beauty, and for simple enjoyment of the art. (Nonfiction/Picture book. 4+)"
The creator of the outstandingly elegant Animal Alphabet (1984) presents 12 beautifully composed, exquisitely detailed full-page portraits of animals in action: a sea otter floating on its back cracking mollusks; an archerfish squirting down a ladybug; a pair of eagles, talons linked, dramatically plummeting in their courtship ritual; a pair of handsome blue dung beetles at work; a golden dormouse curled peacefully in golden dry grass. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 21, 2009

"Despite a few faults, an interesting and informative story."
Exhaustively researched, reader-friendly narrative of the telecom industry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PIG IN A BARROW by Bert Kitchen
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1991

"For admirers of Kitchens's splendid Animal Alphabet (1984), a disappointment. (Picture book. 4-8)"
As in Gorilla, Chinchilla (1990), some rather inane verse (``The hen in a bucket/Watches her chick,/Who's learning to balance—/A difficult trick'') serves to caption some odd pairings, in this case of animals and their containers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BANKING LITE by Bert Harris
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 15, 2013

"A thoughtful look at a vanishing corner of the banking industry."
In his debut memoir, Harris offers an insider's look at the long-gone era of small-town banking while chronicling the shift to a less personal, more complex way of doing business. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ELEPHANT CAGE by Bert Tarrant
Released: March 19, 2011

"Outlandish but exciting entertainment for fans of technology, geopolitics and even romance."
A teenager-against-the-world techno-thriller about a young Alaskan hacker and his battle with Russia after a nuclear strike on the United States. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

New York Scramble by Bert Silva
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2015

"An engaging romp that fuses love, art, and seedy, midcentury New York."
A struggling freelance artist in 1957 forms an unlikely relationship with a New York mobster in this quirky throwback to the '50s crime novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1997

"Those looking for a clear path through the euthanasia maze will not find it here; they will, however, meet a unique and curious mind, possessed by a physician with a conscience, which is always a pleasure."
Idiosyncratic musings of an intellectual, humanistic Dutch physician working in a nursing home for the terminally ill, where physician-assisted suicide is accepted as a way of death. Read full book review >