Search Results: "Beth Ain"


BOOK REVIEW

STARRING JULES (AS HERSELF) by Beth Ain
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2013

"Though not as distinctive as Clementine, Jules eventually settles, becoming a vulnerable and likable heroine. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Seven-year-old Jules has been asked to audition for a television commercial. But she needs help. Will she turn to her know-it-all ex-best friend for it? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STARRING JULES (SUPER-SECRET SPY GIRL) by Beth Ain
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 25, 2014

"Fans of Jules' previous books will enjoy seeing the soon-to-be-third-grader back in action as she exuberantly experiences the busy life of a budding television and film star. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Even though she'll be spending it in Quebec filming a movie, child actress Jules' summer is not off to a good start. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IZZY KLINE HAS BUTTERFLIES by Beth Ain
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 7, 2017

"Light, bright, and believable, just right for young middle graders. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Small moments, both good and bad, characterize Izzy Kline's fourth-grade year, the year she finds a new best friend. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STARRING JULES (IN DRAMA-RAMA) by Beth Ain
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 27, 2013

"Still, Jules is a lovable star with good friends and a supportive family, living a frenetic city life that is constantly entertaining. Fans of Clementine and Gooney Bird Greene will look forward to the next book in the series. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Second-grader Jules Bloom returns for another audition (Starring Jules (as Herself), 2013)—this time for a television sitcom—with New York City-sized tension and hilarity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ABC GULLS by Beth Rand
by Beth Rand, illustrated by Beth Rand
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 28, 2017

"Kids without a frame of reference will still get a kick out of these goofy gulls. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Take a seaside location, add a colony of gulls and the alphabet, and the result is a clever abecedary specific to Maine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONE THING STOLEN by Beth Kephart
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 7, 2015

"Disturbing, sometimes unsettling and ultimately offering a sliver of hope, this effort rivetingly captures the destructive effects of mental and physical illness on a likable, sweet-natured teen. (Fiction. 11-18)"
Something very bad is happening to 17-year-old Nadia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SMALL DAMAGES by Beth Kephart
YOUNG ADULT
Released: July 19, 2012

"Lovely and unusual—at once epic and intimate. (Fiction. 13 & up)"
A young woman is forced into unexpected territory when she is packed off to a vividly imagined, shimmering Spanish countryside in order to conceal an unexpected pregnancy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHELTER by Beth Cooley
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Nov. 14, 2006

"Readers will find a moving glimpse into a different kind of life, with the more frightening aspects downplayed. (Fiction. YA)"
Sixteen-year-old Lucy's family has been in a downward economic and emotional spiral since the death of her father several months earlier. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MORE THAN YOU KNOW by Beth Gutcheon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2000

"Schematic plot, unconvincing characters: both undo what a potentially haunting love story."
From a usually deft storyteller (Five Fortunes, 1998, etc.), an uncompelling ghost tale, set in Maine and spanning two centuries, that fails to either beguile or bewitch. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CITY OF BOYS by Beth Nugent
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 11, 1992

"Weird, hypnotic, and highly promising."
Nugent, whose stories have appeared in The New Yorker and Mademoiselle, as well as in The Best American Short Stories 1985 and other anthologies, opens a door in this first collection to a bleak world whose hopelessness weighs heavy at times, but whose characters linger in the memory. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BUT COME YE BACK by Beth Lordan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2004

"There's nothing flashy here, but each image, moment, and word counts and builds as the characters' lives overlap—overlap in connections the more powerful for their subtlety."
Life is an accumulation of told and, more importantly, untold stories in a quietly remarkable linked collection (a second from Lordan: And Both Shall Row, 1998) about a couple who retire to Ireland. Read full book review >