Search Results: "Beth Spiegel"


BOOK REVIEW

WILL IT BE A BABY BROTHER? by Eve Bunting
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"Sweet and simple, this joins a handful of sibling-on-the-way books—including But I Wanted a Baby Brother, by Kate Feiffer and illustrated by Diane Goode (2010)—that traverse the same topic and extend, with great wit, beyond the new baby's arrival. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Bunting, who's known for her ability to artfully explore troubling issues, touches here on a lighter topic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROSA’S ROOM by Barbara Bottner
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2004

"A welcome addition sure to calm the worries of youngsters facing a similar situation. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Bottner offers a heartwarming story of a young girl moving to a new house and a too-empty room. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIRST GRADE STINKS! by Mary Ann Rodman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"For young readers approaching this or any other significant transition with trepidation, Rodman's humorous tale serves as a gentle reminder to search for the silver lining. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Rodman's witty take on the harsh realities of first grade, as perceived by those in the trenches, will tickle readers' funny bones. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Practical, caring, and strongly recommended."
Solid, research-based study of how to make the most out of life when faced with death. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Heart of Wellness by S.J. Spiegel
Released: June 29, 2016

"An intriguing, idiosyncratic tour through humanity's stumbling but progressive journey toward wellness."
A cancer-surviving lawyer discusses the evolution of scientific inquiry and value of a holistic approach to life and wellness in this debut nonfiction work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"A rewarding anthology by women who take the Bible seriously and on its own terms, as a literary, ethical, and spiritual expression."
A group of really smart women give astute readings of the Bible that, for the most part, subscribe to neither religious nor feminist orthodoxies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMETIMES I LIE AND SOMETIMES I DON'T by Nadja Spiegel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 18, 2015

"This collection is unlikely to bring new readers to experimental fiction, but fans of authors like Lydia Davis, Ben Marcus, and Jenny Offill will want to check it out."
Debut collection from an award-winning Austrian author, a fresh new voice in innovative fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ABC GULLS by Beth Rand
by Beth Rand, illustrated by Beth Rand
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 28, 2017

"Kids without a frame of reference will still get a kick out of these goofy gulls. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Take a seaside location, add a colony of gulls and the alphabet, and the result is a clever abecedary specific to Maine. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

OFF TO SUMMER CAMP
by Leila Roy

The summer camp book that I covered earlier this week wasn’t a great fit for me.

It’s also been a couple of years since I’ve put together a list of recent summer camp books.

Looks like it’s time to take a look around and see what other camp books have cropped up over the last few years!

Camp Dork, by ...
Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

BIG FAT DISASTER by Beth Fehlbaum
YOUNG ADULT
Released: April 18, 2014

"Colby's experiences, while extreme, ring true, and the fast pace, lively and profane dialogue, and timely topic make it a quick and enjoyable read. (Fiction. 12-16)"
Colby's life as the heavy daughter of a disapproving former Miss Texas beauty queen is difficult enough, but it gets worse very quickly once she discovers a photo of her politician father kissing another woman. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PACK OF DORKS by Beth Vrabel
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"Lucy's perfectly feisty narration, the emotionally resonant situations and the importance of the topic all elevate this effort well above the pack. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Debut author Vrabel takes three knotty, seemingly disparate problems—bullying, the plight of wolves and coping with disability—and with tact and grace knits them into an engrossing whole of despair and redemption. Read full book review >