Search Results: "Bethany Barton"


BOOK REVIEW

I'M TRYING TO LOVE SPIDERS by Bethany Barton
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 7, 2015

"Both arachnophobes and arachnophiles will find useful debate fodder squashed within these pages. (Picture book. 3-12)"
What if "trying" not to hate spiders doesn't quite cut it? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GIVE BEES A CHANCE by Bethany Barton
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 25, 2017

"Even the most bee-phobic readers will have a hard time resisting this swarm of humor and fact. (author's note) (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
Following much the same format as in I'm Trying to Love Spiders (2015), Barton makes a strong case for the value of bees. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIS MONSTER CANNOT WAIT! by Bethany Barton
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 18, 2013

"For youngsters working on self-control (a school-readiness skill), Stewart does…eventually…learn that good things come to those who wait. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Stewart, from This Monster Needs a Haircut (2012), is going camping for the first time, and he (literally) cannot wait. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIS MONSTER NEEDS A HAIRCUT by Bethany Barton
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 5, 2012

"Neither terrible nor terribly interesting; Elivia Savadier's No Haircut Today! (2005) is a more distilled treatment of the same subject. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Visually energetic but unsophisticated, with pedestrian text, this may be selected more by parents hoping the humor will coax their kids into a haircut than by the kids themselves. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Searching for Barton Carter by Nancy Barton Carter Clough
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 2, 2015

"A congested but nevertheless in-depth investigation of an overlooked war and the types of people drawn to it."
From debut author Clough comes a historical biography of an American's involvement in the Spanish Civil War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BYRON BARTON COLLECTION #1 by Byron Barton
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 18, 2013

"Bright, simple and loaded with big machines—a steam engine, a fire boat and even a crop-duster, among others—this app is sure to appeal to young transportation enthusiasts. (iPad informational app. 2-5)"
Barton's books about transportation are notable for their spare simplicity and bright pop-art illustrations; here, four gain added value with features that both entertain and encourage reading skills. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 6, 2012

"A multifaceted journey for devotees of Vertigo to contemplate and enjoy."
Last time the world heard from Judy Barton she was tumbling out of the bell tower at Mission San Juan Bautista to her death, but it turns out the ethereal beauty of Alfred Hitchcock's 1958 masterpiece Vertigo has more to say. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY NAME IS LUCY BARTON by Elizabeth Strout
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"Fiction with the condensed power of poetry: Strout deepens her mastery with each new work, and her psychological acuity has never required improvement."
From Pulitzer Prize-winning Strout (The Burgess Boys, 2013, etc.), a short, stark novel about the ways we break and maintain the bonds of family.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUMMER ON THE SHORT BUS by Bethany Crandell
YOUNG ADULT
Released: April 1, 2014

"Readers who want 'moments' should spend time with the campers in Harriet McBryde Johnson's Accidents of Nature (2006), who are already human beings. (Fiction. 13-18)"
Constance "Cricket" Montgomery is horrified when, as a semipunishment, her wealthy father nixes her vacation to Maui and sends her to work at Camp I Can "with a bunch of retards" and a strict counselor who knows Cricket mysteriously well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STUNG by Bethany Wiggins
YOUNG ADULT
Released: April 2, 2013

"Readers will gladly be bitten by this bug. (Science fiction. 12 & up)"
Fiona Tarsis wakes up to a world of nightmares in this fast-paced, fever-bright post-apocalyptic adventure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 1, 1980

"But the book—in an oblong, picture-book format—is packed with family photos and examples of Tudor's handiwork; and children may well take it—not too seriously—as itself a kind of historic restoration."
Tasha Tudor, we learn with some wonder, has managed to live the rustic, old-fashioned life depicted in her books; and the nice thing about daughter Bethany's admiring portrayal of that life is its suggestibility—the satisfactions of molding butter or weaving baskets; the procession of holidays imaginatively observed (with candlelit birthday cakes actuary floating down the river—as in Becky's Birthday—and miniature valentines for the costume dolls); the sense of the least repast as an Occasion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CURED by Bethany Wiggins
YOUNG ADULT
Released: March 4, 2014

"Despair and destruction are sweetened by hope and love. (Science fiction. 14 & up)"
Jack Bloom leaves behind a sheltered, if slightly warped, suburban life to seek missing brother Dean and Mrs. Tarsis, the woman Dean tried to lead to safety, in this simmering sequel to Stung (2013). Read full book review >