Search Results: "Betsy Byars"


BOOK REVIEW

RAMA THE GYPSY CAT by Betsy Byars
Released: Oct. 17, 1966

"The story is episodic and moody, and the frank approach may rub some readers' fur the wrong way, but objective cat lovers will appreciate this."
Cats are less likely to be centered on in juvenile fiction than dogs, horses, or other loyal animals—the errant Black Beauty way of life is too well suited to their personality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WINGED COLT OF CASA MIA by Betsy Byars
Released: Oct. 1, 1973

"Byars reworks the boy-man-horse formula with considerable skill but with none of the richly imagined vitality of her House of Wings (1972)."
Except for the colt's wings this is a typical realistic story — with none of the hushed wonder that usually accompanies such a fantasy element — in which the relationship between a boy and a man is intertwined with a boy's love for an animal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEANS ON THE ROOF by Betsy Byars
Released: Oct. 4, 1988

"Young readers should be delighted."
In a novel that is hardly more difficult than an easy reader (though longer), the Beans are a typical Byars family: Papa sells fruits and vegetables; they live in an apartment house from which they wave at neighbors across the street; and they are distinguished by their common-sense and love for one another rather than by their cleverness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MIDNIGHT FOX by Betsy Byars
Released: Oct. 14, 1968

"The laughs are most frequent in the beginning, which gets a reader's attention, and the sly, slow build-up to the final black fox episode is as firm as you could ask for."
A nine-year-old boy with a sense of humor is hard enough to bring to the printed page (or snag in a library), but if you'll latch on to a live one, Betsy Byars has his match. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SUMMER OF THE SWANS by Betsy Byars
Released: March 30, 1970

"The book is a succession of clicks that connect, a sparse but acute self-possessing."
With increasing frequency juvenile fiction is contracting to the dimensions of a short story and the endoskeleton (dialogue, stage directions, asides to the audience) of drama—of which the climax to Sara's season of discontent is a good example. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TV KID by Betsy Byars
Released: March 1, 1976

"The snakebite is a jolt of real life in the spirit of Mouse's beating in The Eighteenth Emergency (1973), and it works in the same bracing if limited way—with the punch of a well-developed short story."
Lennie lives with his mother, who manages the Fairy Land Motel, and hides from his failures at school and friendship behind a cloud of TV fantasies, and though he's clearly a sad case there is gusto and imagination in the constantly running mental video tape in which he projects himself as the hapless contestant on Give It a Spin or the hero in a new western, protecting a toothless old dragon from charges of sheep killing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CARTOONIST by Betsy Byars
Released: April 3, 1978

"And through it all shines Alfie's devotion to cartooning—an escape, a compensation, even a symptom, that clearly emerges as a strength."
Alfie's grandfather is becoming senile, his sympathetic older sister is usually working, and his immature, TV-watching mother is chiefly a nuisance to be avoided. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GLORY GIRL by Betsy Byars
Released: Sept. 1, 1983

"Again Byars gives us a gratifying and entertaining picture of a solid, solitary kid coming into her own through the odd interactions of an unglamorous, snappily projected family."
As the only Glory who can't sing—instead, she sells the Glory Gospel Singers' tapes and records after performances by the rest of the family—Anna has some reason to feel like a Cinderella. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HOUSE OF WINGS by Daniel Schwartz
Released: April 27, 1972

"By the end we too have come to know the touchingly but unsentimentally rendered Sammy and the marvelous old man."
From the beginning Sammy's first day with his Ohio grandfather is experienced not as a more or less skillfully constructed fiction but as a vibrant reality that happens as we read. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AFTER THE GOAT MAN by Ronald Himler
Released: Oct. 1, 1974

"Slight in body, trite in plot, but very nicely handled."
The small cast — three children and a dispossessed old man whose shack is in the path of a new superhighway — sounds familiar, and the relatively short time span and few incidents make this more like a story than even a children's novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CYBIL WAR by Gail Owens
Released: April 27, 1981

"Oh yes, the young hero does end up with the girl, on an after-the-movies bicycle ride more suited than the movie date to their age and inclinations."
Young love, fifth-grade variety, portrayed with warmth and humor and that extra, penetrating touch one expects of Byars. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BINGO BROWN, GYPSY LOVER by Cathy Bobak
Released: May 1, 1990

"A treat for fans of both Bingo and Byars."
In his third appearance, the likable preteen adds a new experience—the suspenseful premature birth of a new brother—to his ongoing, but still tentative, interest in the opposite sex. Read full book review >