Search Results: "Betsy Byars"


BOOK REVIEW

RAMA THE GYPSY CAT by Betsy Byars
Released: Oct. 17, 1966

"The story is episodic and moody, and the frank approach may rub some readers' fur the wrong way, but objective cat lovers will appreciate this."
Cats are less likely to be centered on in juvenile fiction than dogs, horses, or other loyal animals—the errant Black Beauty way of life is too well suited to their personality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WINGED COLT OF CASA MIA by Betsy Byars
Released: Oct. 1, 1973

"Byars reworks the boy-man-horse formula with considerable skill but with none of the richly imagined vitality of her House of Wings (1972)."
Except for the colt's wings this is a typical realistic story — with none of the hushed wonder that usually accompanies such a fantasy element — in which the relationship between a boy and a man is intertwined with a boy's love for an animal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MIDNIGHT FOX by Betsy Byars
Released: Oct. 14, 1968

"The laughs are most frequent in the beginning, which gets a reader's attention, and the sly, slow build-up to the final black fox episode is as firm as you could ask for."
A nine-year-old boy with a sense of humor is hard enough to bring to the printed page (or snag in a library), but if you'll latch on to a live one, Betsy Byars has his match. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOOD-BYE, CHICKEN LITTLE by Betsy Byars
Released: March 1, 1979

"Still, Jimmie's feelings throughout are represented in depth, and revealed in flashes of insight that hit the mark; and the story hums with the currents that flow between him and the others."
Chicken is the name Jimmie Little gave himself because of the fears he developed the summer after his father was killed in a mine accident, but readers will find Jimmie is only sensible, as compared with his mother's beloved, less cautious brother Pete. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CARTOONIST by Betsy Byars
Released: April 3, 1978

"And through it all shines Alfie's devotion to cartooning—an escape, a compensation, even a symptom, that clearly emerges as a strength."
Alfie's grandfather is becoming senile, his sympathetic older sister is usually working, and his immature, TV-watching mother is chiefly a nuisance to be avoided. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 3, 1986

"Not to be missed."
At first glance, two people could hardly be less alike than that irrepressible inventor, Junior Blossom, and Mad Mary Cantrell, rural equivalent of a bag lady. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1982

"But Weezie is a touching character, the grandmother a vivid caricature, and Warren's screenplays give him the starch he needs as a character too."
About the daydreams indulged in by Warren, who lives with his grandmother and his older (high-school) sister Weezie because his mother is a fugitive. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COMPUTER NUT by Guy Byars
Released: Oct. 1, 1984

"The who's-on-the-computer? gambit, and the true-to-character humor holds up well enough to keep readers going—even if the thwarted space-comedian bombs out."
Airy computer hijinks—with something of a letdown when the secret's out. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GOLLY SISTERS GO WEST by Sue Truesdell
Released: Oct. 1, 1986

"This is Byars' first easy reader; more would be welcome."
Traveling by horse-drawn covered wagon, May-May and Rose Golly joke and bicker their way along the American frontier, entertaining the locals with their singing and dancing as they go. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BINGO BROWN AND THE LANGUAGE OF LOVE by Cathy Bobak
Released: May 1, 1989

"Byars' second look at this questing, likable boy is sure to amuse her fans and his."
As pungent and wholesome as the gingersnaps whose smell reminds Bingo of Melissa—his girlfriend, who has now moved to Oklahoma—a welcome sequel to The Burning Questions of Bingo Brown (1988). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1998

"Some plot elements get short shrift, but several characters show surprising depth, and readers should be prepared to read this in one breathless sitting. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Frizzing up whenever danger threatens, amateur sleuth Herculeah Jones's hair gets a real workout in this tale of murder, weight, and family secrets. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DARK STAIRS by Betsy Byars
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"A promising start for a series that could easily become a popular alternative to massmarket mysteries. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A versatile standby (1971 Newbery) brings her usual brisk aplomb to a projected series about a self-reliant early teen whose first adventure is closer in spirit, despite her name, to the Nancy Drews recalled by its jacket than to the exploits of Indiana Jones. Read full book review >