Search Results: "Bevin Alexander"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 2008

"Still, Civil War buffs will learn a thing or two from Alexander's considerations of events."
The Stars and Bars might yet wave, if only someone could have convinced Robert E. Lee not to attempt all those frontal assaults on heavily defended positions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2002

"For warriors as well as the general public."
Alexander (How Hitler Could Have Won World War II, 2000, etc.) illuminates each of his 13 "rules" by using historical conflicts where conformity to one of the rules carried the day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 31, 2011

"A work as much fun to read as it is knowledgeable and authoritative."
A clever, incisive look at great battles from Saratoga to the American invasion of North Korea at Inchon and their success or failure as per the principles of Sun Tzu's The Art of War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 2000

"An engrossing military history, with chilling undertones of what might have been."
Creepy title aside, this is a crisp, effective WWII narrative, highlighting the many moments, invisible in the mechanized chaos of battle, where the worm might have turned against the free world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 23, 1992

"Jackson's military career. (Sixteen pages of maps.)"
Alexander (Korea, 1986), in a significant and well-argued contribution to the already massive corpus of Robert E. Lee/Stonewall Jackson scholarship, asserts that ``Stonewall Jackson, not Lee, possessed the strategic vision necessary to win key battles''—and perhaps the Civil War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FUTURE OF WARFARE by Bevin Alexander
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1995

"While some chapters here would make good magazine articles, as a whole the book lacks perspective, and with its silence on the human catastrophe in Bosnia, it fails the key test of relevance."
Contrary to its title, this book is not about the future of warfare, but rather the types of war the author expects the US to get involved in next. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MACARTHUR'S WAR by Bevin Alexander
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 7, 2013

"A well-focused cautionary tale about the checks and balances of power."
Versatile military historian Alexander (Sun Tzu at Gettysburg: Ancient Military Wisdom in the Modern World, 2011, etc.), a Korean War veteran, takes on the perilous confrontation between the U.S. military and the civilian command during that war. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 2, 2014

"Alexander's over-the-top advocacy of Jackson's prowess and sour attacks on everyone else detract from an otherwise thoughtful analysis of the general's tactical insights."
A highly partisan review of the career of an outstanding Confederate commander. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW GREAT GENERALS WIN by Bevin Alexander
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 9, 1993

"Informed opinions on the martial arts that draw provocative distinctions between victors and winners. (Maps—not seen)"
An astute military historian's mildly contrarian appraisal of what separates the sheep from the wolves in the great game of war. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAGIC THUMBELINA by Alexander Pogrebniak
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 29, 2011

"Not the slickest app ever, but the art is well worth second and third looks. (iPad storybook app. 7-9)"
An alternate track of instrumental rock adds an unusual dimension to this paraphrased version of the classic female-bondage/abandonment tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LILA BLOOM by Alexander Stadler
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 5, 2004

After a bad day at school a little girl named Lila announces to her caretaker aunt and her ballet teacher, Madame Vera, that she wants to quit her strictly run ballet class. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DUNCAN RUMPLEMEYER’S BAD BIRTHDAY by Alexander Stadler
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"The Message hangs heavy over this, but Duncan's distinctive voice, plus a light touch with the moral, makes it a persuasive exercise in the benefits of socialization. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Stadler's jagged, thick-lined art may resemble William Steig's, but his young narrator is pure Jules Feiffer: "Why share? Read full book review >