Search Results: "Bill Ayers"


BOOK REVIEW

PUBLIC ENEMY by Bill Ayers
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 12, 2013

"No matter how they feel about his politics, readers of this memoir should find the author's humanity irresistible."
The one-time Weather Underground fugitive talks about his life as a political bogeyman. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FUGITIVE DAYS by Bill Ayers
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Younger readers who weren't around during the Vietnam protest era will still feel like they're missing something."
An overblown yet oddly sketchy memoir recalling Ayers's days in the Weather Underground. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 9, 1997

"Likely to challenge many of our preconceptions, this is a graceful and passionate vision of the criminal justice system. (For another look at Chicago's troubled youth, see LeAlan Jones and Lloyd Newman's Our America, p. 612.) (Author tour)"
A sympathetic, revealing portrait of young people caught up in the juvenile justice system, and a searing indictment of the society that has failed to nurture them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PROMISE OF THE NEW SOUTH, 1877-1906 by Edward L. Ayers
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Ayers succeeds in depicting the post-Reconstruction South not as a repressed backwater of American life, but as a region that, despite substantial injustices, made significant contributions to American life."
A uniquely comprehensive cultural, political, and social history of post-Reconstruction, exploring not only ``the South's deep poverty and institutionalized injustice'' but also ``the complexity of experience in the new South.'' Ayers (History/Univ. of Virginia; Vengeance and Justice, 1983) aims ``to understand what it meant to live in the American South in the years after Reconstruction.'' To achieve this, he examines the matrix of economic and societal forces that shaped the South's singular culture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VIRGIN AND OTHER STORIES by April Ayers Lawson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"Meaty, satisfying tales of a substance that suggests Lawson would make a fine novelist."
Debut collection limns a variety of troubled characters searching for solace of both sexual and spiritual varieties in the contemporary South. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 2001

"Even so, these are mostly sound essays illuminating how the media's coverage of juvenile crime has led to blanket policies that can make little sense."
An analysis of the "zero tolerance" policies often implemented in today's schools, and the ways these policies have disproportionately affected black and Latino students. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 20, 2005

"Thoughtful, balanced, well-written American history."
Essays by a Southern historian reflecting on what makes his region distinctive. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"Top-drawer American history, especially for Civil War buffs."
A first-rate study of the origins and early years of the Civil War, focusing on neighboring communities North and South. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

BILL ROORBACH
by Gregory McNamee

Bobby Mullendore, a sixth grader, has just committed the perfect crime: he’s excused himself, permanently, from school with a crafty stratagem, and now he’s on the loose, ready to enjoy a Huck Finn existence of wandering in the woods of a country estate. Alas, those woods hold other plans for him, for a man who “smelled of cologne” and “looked ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

TRANSFORMED by Bill Slavin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

"Closing with a look at 11 basic substances (plus one process, 'Recycling'), this behind-the-scenes-at-the-factory tour isn't going to dislodge David Macaulay's New Way Things Work (1998) from the top of the heap of similar titles, but it makes good light fare for casual browsing. (Nonfiction. 9-11)"
Slavin boils down the processing or construction of 39 common products, from baseballs to kitty litter, into a few steps—each of which is illustrated with a cartoon scene featuring a crew of thumb-sized workers in overalls. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

BILL HAYES
by Alex Layman

Bill Hayes was 48 when he moved from San Francisco to New York. His longtime partner had died suddenly, and after a lifetime on the West Coast, Hayes was looking for a place to reinvent himself. In New York, he found exactly that. Shortly after moving, Hayes begins a relationship with famed neurologist and writer Oliver Sacks. What unfolds from ...


Read the full post >