Search Results: "Bill Bryson"


BOOK REVIEW

A SHORT HISTORY OF NEARLY EVERYTHING by Bill Bryson
NON-FICTION
Released: May 6, 2003

"Loads of good explaining, with reminders, time and again, of how much remains unknown, neatly putting the death of science into perspective."
Bryson (I'm a Stranger Here Myself, 1999, etc.), a man who knows how to track down an explanation and make it confess, asks the hard questions of science—e.g., how did things get to be the way they are?—and, when possible, provides answers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN A SUNBURNED COUNTRY by Bill Bryson
Released: June 6, 2000

"Bryson is a real traveler, the kind of guy who can be entertained by (and be entertaining about) a featureless landscape scattered with 'rocks the color of bad teeth.' Fortunately for him and for us, there's a lot more to Australia than that."
Just in time for Sydney's upcoming Olympic games, this travel narrative from veteran wanderer Bryson (I'm a Stranger Here Myself, 1999, etc.) provides an appreciative, informative, and hilarious portrait of the land Down Under. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONE SUMMER by Bill Bryson
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2013

"A distinctively drawn time capsule from a definitive epoch."
A popular chronicler of life and lore vividly charts a particularly pivotal season in American history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOTES FROM A SMALL ISLAND by Bill Bryson
Released: May 1, 1996

"But all in all, a tasty crumpet."
After two decades as a resident of England, Bryson (Made in America, 1995, etc.) bids a very fond farewell to that sceptered isle, to that promontory of clotted cream. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1995

"If, as the old saw has it, England and America are two countries divided by a common language, here's some disarming help sent by a Yank from the other side of the pond."
Ex-patriate journalist Bryson (Neither Here Nor There, 1992, etc.) skims the history and present condition of American English. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 2, 2010

"Premium vest-pocket histories of science."
The Royal Society has been incubating and disseminating scientific illumination for 350 years, as Bryson (Shakespeare: The World as Stage, 2007, etc.) and his fellow contributors gracefully attest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A REALLY SHORT HISTORY OF NEARLY EVERYTHING by Bill Bryson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 27, 2009

In this abridged and illustrated version of his Short History of Nearly Everything (2003), Bryson invites a younger crowd of seekers on a tour of time, space and science—from the Big Bang and the birth of the solar system to the growth and study of life on Earth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHAKESPEARE by Bill Bryson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2007

"Shakespeare redux for the common reader."
A telling glance at one of history's most famously unknowable figures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MOTHER TONGUE by Bill Bryson
Released: July 17, 1990

"An erudite delight, sure to captivate many."
A merry and bright Baedeker to the English language, its history, character, and probable future. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEST AMERICAN TRAVEL WRITING 2000 by Bill Bryson
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 26, 2000

"If it's Tuesday, this must be yet another annual volume to dip into at random."
The inaugural issue of an anthology of the year's best travel pieces. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 12, 1999

"Truly and beguilingly, if you are a jaded resident of the USA, Bryson can rekindle your wonder and delight in the life and land around you."
Waggish observations on everyday life in the US from bestselling Bryson (A Walk in the Woods, 1998, etc.), a guy who can find the humor in a bag of hammers and, often enough, the lesson too. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 4, 1998

"'Walking is what we did,' Bryson states: 800-plus out of the 2,100-plus miles, and that good sliver is sheer comic travel entertainment."
The Appalachian Trail—from Springer Mountain, Ga., to Mount Katahdin, Me.—consists of some five million steps, and Bryson (Notes from a Small Island, 1996, etc.) seems to coax a laugh, and often an unexpectedly startling insight, out of each one he traverses. Read full book review >