Search Results: "Bill Emmott"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 9, 2017

"Good fuel for those who think that the sitting U.S. president is the worst thing to happen to democracy since Xerxes."
The West is premised on political and economic ideals that are under threat—from Beijing, from Moscow, and from Washington, D.C. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"Hopeful and divertingly meaty ruminations, made comprehensible."
Economist editor-in-chief Emmott assays the upcoming 88 years in terms of survival of the world as we know it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 5, 2008

"Brightly written, in Economist tradition, and of much interest to fiscal wonks, geopoliticians and investors."
The East, to steal a line from Mao, is red: red-hot, that is, economically, and on the way to reshaping the global economy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 14, 2012

"Well reported but with debatable theoretical underpinnings."
The former editor-in-chief of the Economist finds a few bright spots amid the dark economic clouds in post-Berlusconi Italy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"An evenhanded audit of an industrial power whose offshore ventures could prove no more of a challenge than those launched by US prototypes during the 1960's."
A measured appraisal of the threat, if any, posed by the 1986- 91 investments made by Japanese multinationals in the EC and the US. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TEN BILLION by Stephen Emmott
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 10, 2013

"Shocking facts and an indispensable message to galvanize a world in potential crisis."
A rallying call to arms on the deteriorating state of our overcrowded planet. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

BILL GOLDSTEIN
by Mark Athitakis

In 1922 the poet Ezra Pound wrote that “the Christian Era ended at midnight on Oct. 29-30 of last year”—that is, the moment James Joyce finished writing Ulysses. Pound’s pronouncement helped stoke a kind of folk tale that has accompanied the novel ever since. Joyce unleashed his experimental masterwork, the story goes, and then the rest of the literary world ...


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BLOG POST

BILL ROORBACH
by Gregory McNamee

Bobby Mullendore, a sixth grader, has just committed the perfect crime: he’s excused himself, permanently, from school with a crafty stratagem, and now he’s on the loose, ready to enjoy a Huck Finn existence of wandering in the woods of a country estate. Alas, those woods hold other plans for him, for a man who “smelled of cologne” and “looked ...


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BLOG POST

BILL HAYES
by Alex Layman

Bill Hayes was 48 when he moved from San Francisco to New York. His longtime partner had died suddenly, and after a lifetime on the West Coast, Hayes was looking for a place to reinvent himself. In New York, he found exactly that. Shortly after moving, Hayes begins a relationship with famed neurologist and writer Oliver Sacks. What unfolds from ...


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BOOK REVIEW

TRANSFORMED by Bill Slavin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

"Closing with a look at 11 basic substances (plus one process, 'Recycling'), this behind-the-scenes-at-the-factory tour isn't going to dislodge David Macaulay's New Way Things Work (1998) from the top of the heap of similar titles, but it makes good light fare for casual browsing. (Nonfiction. 9-11)"
Slavin boils down the processing or construction of 39 common products, from baseballs to kitty litter, into a few steps—each of which is illustrated with a cartoon scene featuring a crew of thumb-sized workers in overalls. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PORCUPINE OF TRUTH by Bill Konigsberg
YOUNG ADULT
Released: May 26, 2015

"Equal parts funny and profound. (Fiction. 14-18)"
A straight, white wisecracking atheist from New York City finds both his mind and heart opened when he spends a summer in Billings, Montana, with his estranged, dying father. Read full book review >