Search Results: "Bill Fletcher Jr."


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 28, 2012

"An effective presentation of the importance of trade unions in a democracy."
Talking points to help trade unionists and their supporters rebut conservative attacks. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NO TIME TO SAY GOODBYE by Bill Adler, Jr.
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2017

"While delivering an intriguing premise, this sci-fi tale ends too soon."
In this novella, a surgeon finds himself jumping forward in time, with each interval growing longer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 12, 2010

"Worth digesting, whether the reader relies on it for self-help purposes or merely for nonfiction entertainment."
An unusual hybrid work of self-help, business and narrative nonfiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 16, 2008

"Lacks structure and conclusiveness, but effectively underscores the widely reported disaffection of recent West Point classes with the military."
The heavy toll of fighting on two fronts, as experienced by the first U.S. Military Academy class to graduate into active combat since Vietnam. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 4, 2008

A veritable pantheon of illlustrators contributes work to this delicious collection of Martin's favorite poems. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WIZARD by Bill Martin Jr.
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Schaefer handles this potentially terrifying story with a light touch; suspense hangs in the air, but the characters are this side of scary. (Picture book. 3-8)"
The wizard is in his chamber, the cauldron is on the fire. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAESTRO PLAYS by Vladimir Radunsky
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 15, 1994

"The effect is circus-like, a vertiginous celebration of sound and color."
Two maestros play here — one with words, the other with color, form, and space — in what is one of the most visually emphatic picture books of the year. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BABY BEAR, BABY BEAR, WHAT DO YOU SEE? by Bill Martin Jr.
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2007

"Martin died in 2004—here's a fitting close to what will likely remain his most lasting work for children. (Picture book. 3-5)"
In its fourth—and billed as final—iteration, this primary level Q-and-A introduces ten North American mammals, from red fox and blue heron to rattlesnake, mule deer and finally (unspecified, but possibly Kodiak) Mama Bear. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

“FIRE! FIRE!” SAID MRS. MCGUIRE by Bill Martin Jr.
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2006

"A die-cut keyhole adds extra interest, though for design reasons it only penetrates the first few pages and the last one. (Picture book. 4-6)"
For the third set of illustrations put to Martin's much-revised version of an old rhyme (Ted Schroeder, 1970; Richard Egielski, 1996), Radunsky creates a cast of fuzzy-edged mice in a darkened room, who sound the alarm after spotting flames visible through a door's keyhole. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POLAR BEAR, POLAR BEAR, WHAT DO YOU HEAR? by Bill Martin Jr.
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Brown Bear special. (Picture book. 2- 6)"
After a full generation, a companion to a perennial favorite (Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?, 1967). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

"FIRE! FIRE!" SAID MRS. McGUIRE by Bill Martin Jr.
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1996

"That stereotyping contradicts the spirit of fresh perceptions shown in the rest of the book, but its bold, breezy tone helps compensate for the offense, and youngsters will be captivated by the colorful scenes and forceful language. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Women are depicted here in a number of unexpected roles, including the heroic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROCK IT, SOCK IT, NUMBER LINE by Bill Martin Jr.
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Although this effort doesn't quite match the magic of Martin's best work, these dancing numbers and veggies will fit right in to story hours with themes of gardens, soup, or counting. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Martin rocks on with his current collaborator (Adam, Adam What Do You See?, not reviewed, etc.), in a garden-themed counting book obviously intended as a companion to the ever-popular Chicka Chicka Boom Boom (1989). Read full book review >