Search Results: "Bill Jones"


BOOK REVIEW

BILL by Chap Reaver
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1994

"Laced with wonderfully dry humor and pungent observations, a grand yarn that begs to be shared aloud, and again. (Fiction. 10+)"
From the late author of Mote (1990) and A Little Bit Dead (1992; both Edgar winners), an endearing story that, despite its compelling climax and some pleasingly melodramatic features, is markedly less violent than its predecessors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JASPER JONES by Craig Silvey
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 12, 2011

"A richly rewarding exploration of truth and lies by a masterful storyteller. (Fiction. 12 & up)"
Charlie is catapulted into adulthood when Jasper Jones knocks on his window on a blisteringly hot Australian night and leads him to a hidden glade where a girl is hanging from a tree, bruised and bloody. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SKIPPYJON JONES by Judy Schachner
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"Both feline hero and story are full of beans (more Mexican-jumping than pinto) but ay caramba, mucho fun. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Skippyjon Jones insists he's not a Siamese cat despite ears too big for his head and a head too big for his body. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHUCK JONES by Hugh Kenner
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"The other two are Greg Sarris's Mabel McKay: Weaving the Dream, profiling the Pomo basket weaver and medicine woman, and Yvonne Fern's Gene Roddenberry: The Last Conversation, a discussion with the creator of Star Trek."
Dr. Seuss created the Grinch, but it took Chuck Jones to make him move. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"Many of the jokes work, but too often Kelly seems like a desperate comedian, pulling out joy buzzers and chattering teeth and one rubber chicken too many. (Fantasy. 9-12)"
It's hard to believe a book could contain too many chickens, but this novel may test readers' patience. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MEDUSA JONES by Ross Collins
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2008

"Would work especially well alongside a unit on Greek mythology. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A fast-paced and funny middle-school drama about popularity and teasing with a mythological twist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOTHER JONES by Elliott J. Gorn
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2001

"Amid the current concerns over global labor exploitation, this is a timely, unromanticized reminder that human suffering has accompanied industrial change in the past, and that people fought to ameliorate it."
A stimulating biography of the pugnacious labor organizer that sheds light on radical movements while questioning the myth-making machine that surrounds great figures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RAPSCALLION JONES by James Marshall
Released: Oct. 1, 1983

"Trite and lame."
Some hollow flimflam about an aging, needy fox who decides to become a writer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STARMAN JONES by Robert A. Heinlein
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 15, 1953

"Clifford Geary's black and whites add to the Heinlein inventiveness."
Forced-landing on an earth-like planet mars a trip to another solar system, but provides young Max Jones with a set of adventures that see him become a full-fledged Astrogator. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"The frequent, lengthy narrative asides, meant to be funny, will only add to readers' confusion and frustration. (Fiction. 8-12)"
In this absurd adventure, insecure sixth grader Jackson falls into his Great Aunt Harriett's enormous hair. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAVID JONES by Jonathan Miles
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 2, 1996

"But they make a case for his importance, illustrated by works on range of themes, including dreamy landscapes painted in a time of coming war; sexuality depicted in dense oil painting as well as in the ligihter but more complex illustrations of the tale of Lancelot and Guinevere."
Much previously unknown material by British poet-artist David Jones is revealed in this large and attractive volume. Read full book review >