Search Results: "Bill Thomson"


BOOK REVIEW

THE TYPEWRITER by Bill Thomson
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 8, 2016

"Words rule in this intriguing, impressive, imaginative, nearly wordless narrative drama. (Picturebook. 5-9)"
Three kids find an old typewriter, igniting spectacular surprises when they start playing with it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BUILDING WITH DAD by Carol Nevius
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"The story is engrossing on many levels to young builders, and the inspiring perspectives and sheer beauty of the artwork will captivate children and adults alike. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Stunning, photo-realistic paintings entice the reader to pore over the vertical pages in this father-and-son construction venture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KARATE HOUR by Carol Nevius
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"Despite the elaborate illustrations, this offers a more superficial view of karate's inner workings than Anne Rockwell's Chip and the Karate Kick (p. 447), but nonetheless makes an adequate first introduction for prospective karate-kas. (Picture book/nonfiction. 7-9)"
Viewers will definitely feel like participants in this visit to a children's karate class. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOCCER HOUR by Carol Nevius
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

"Although there are plenty of glimmerings as to soccer's mechanics—meeting the punt, trapping he ball, fake out moves and rainbow kicks—and the emphasis on practice making perfect is brightly handled, this is not an instruction book; it is a participatory experience, full of crackling atmosphere. (Picture book. 4-8)"
As per usual (Karate Hour, 2004, etc.), Thomson's artwork grabs the eye first and never lets it go. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

BILL GOLDSTEIN
by Mark Athitakis

In 1922 the poet Ezra Pound wrote that “the Christian Era ended at midnight on Oct. 29-30 of last year”—that is, the moment James Joyce finished writing Ulysses. Pound’s pronouncement helped stoke a kind of folk tale that has accompanied the novel ever since. Joyce unleashed his experimental masterwork, the story goes, and then the rest of the literary world ...


Read the full post >

BLOG POST

BILL ROORBACH
by Gregory McNamee

Bobby Mullendore, a sixth grader, has just committed the perfect crime: he’s excused himself, permanently, from school with a crafty stratagem, and now he’s on the loose, ready to enjoy a Huck Finn existence of wandering in the woods of a country estate. Alas, those woods hold other plans for him, for a man who “smelled of cologne” and “looked ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

DARK LORD by Jamie Thomson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"That said, the final chapters deftly set up Volume 2, already out in the U.K. It's Lord Sauron, powerless and back in middle school…fun in many ways. (Fantasy. 9-14)"
The Dark Lord of the Iron Tower of Despair at the Gates of Doom...has to go to seventh grade!? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GUS OPENSHAW’S WHALE-KILLING JOURNAL by Keith Thomson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 24, 2006

"Dumb fun, smartly imagined."
A blogger-slash-whaler goes hunting for his prey in the Caribbean—where the waters are shark-infested, the crew is always on the verge of mutiny and absurd plot twists arrive with every other paragraph. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JEFFERSON'S SHADOW by Keith Thomson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 27, 2012

"Lucid and concise descriptions and analyses of an active, creative mind fully engaged with the natural world."
A bright, brisk assessment of the scientific interests and contributions of the Sage of Monticello. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRY TO TELL THE STORY by David Thomson
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 4, 2009

"Blends the techniques of film and fiction into a strong, evocative memoir."
Literate film buff Thomson (The Whole Equation: A History of Hollywood, 2004, etc.) recalls his early days. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Compelling, clear-eyed examination of Scott's actions and larger notions of what makes a hero."
Better known today for his books of film biography, history, and criticism (Rosebud, 1996, etc.), Thomson initially came to attention in his native Britain with this vivid 1977 analysis of the great race to the South Pole and the character of the men who led the efforts. Read full book review >