Search Results: "Bill Walsh"


BOOK REVIEW

YES, I COULD CARE LESS by Bill Walsh
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: June 18, 2013

"A frisky reminder that usage issues are part convention, part passion."
A copy editor at the Washington Post returns with his third rant-cum-English usage manual (Lapsing into a Comma, 2000, etc.). Read full book review >

BLOG POST

BILL GOLDSTEIN
by Mark Athitakis

In 1922 the poet Ezra Pound wrote that “the Christian Era ended at midnight on Oct. 29-30 of last year”—that is, the moment James Joyce finished writing Ulysses. Pound’s pronouncement helped stoke a kind of folk tale that has accompanied the novel ever since. Joyce unleashed his experimental masterwork, the story goes, and then the rest of the literary world ...


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BOOK REVIEW

MY BEAK, YOUR BEAK by Melanie Walsh
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 30, 2002

"As there's no corresponding sense of closure in My Beak, Your Beak, the two titles form a seamless whole, making this more like one work for the price of two—still, the theme is certainly important enough to justify the extra expense. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Walsh (Big and Little, not reviewed, etc) continues to delight and inform toddlers with these two celebrations of unity in diversity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DID YOU EVER SEE? by Joanna Walsh
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Science books for the young can and should do better than this. (Picture book. 3-5)"
This new offering from the Tate Gallery's publishing arm asks simple questions about visual perception, challenging readers to make judgments about relationships between familiar objects. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIVING WITH MOM AND LIVING WITH DAD by Melanie Walsh
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2012

"Even with this misgiving, this is a necessary and accessible treatment of a common family constellation. Recommended for children of divorce and for others seeking to understand diverse family structures. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Her parents may be divorced, but this little girl's family is anything but broken. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DO LIONS LIVE ON LILY PADS by Melanie Walsh
ANIMALS
Released: July 24, 2006

"Perfect for story hours, classroom reads or just a rambunctious reading with a single lap-sitter, this is sure to elicit laughs and loud answers from any audience. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Walsh repeats her winning formula, this time asking children about animal's homes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DO MONKEYS TWEET? by Melanie Walsh
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"The simplicity of presentation masks the book's complex wit and trickiness: Children will love it. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Walsh (Do Pigs Have Stripes?, 1996) again asks preschoolers questions to which they probably know the answers, but that doesn't mean they're a snap. ``Do horses bark? Read full book review >

BLOG POST

BILL ROORBACH
by Gregory McNamee

Bobby Mullendore, a sixth grader, has just committed the perfect crime: he’s excused himself, permanently, from school with a crafty stratagem, and now he’s on the loose, ready to enjoy a Huck Finn existence of wandering in the woods of a country estate. Alas, those woods hold other plans for him, for a man who “smelled of cologne” and “looked ...


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BOOK REVIEW

AMOS JELLYBEAN GETS IT RIGHT by Joanna Walsh
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2005

Amos Jellybean knows he's bright (his mum says so), but he still always seems to scramble the many instructions he's given: "So I . . . take my bed downstairs, put it on the table, sit down on my breakfast and eat my clothes." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DO PIGS HAVE STRIPES? by Melanie Walsh
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1996

"The work is easily mastered, and doesn't bear rereading, but certainly has its charms. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Burning questions of the animal world are answered here: Does a bird have a big black wet nose? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ISAAC AND HIS AMAZING ASPERGER SUPERPOWERS! by Melanie Walsh
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 22, 2016

"While simplistic, it's a serviceable starter for discussions of spectrum disorders with younger neurotypical audiences. (URL list) (Picture book. 6-8)"
Isaac explains why he wears a mask and cape and sometimes has special needs. Read full book review >