Search Results: "Boaz Yakin"


BOOK REVIEW

JERUSALEM by Boaz Yakin
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: April 16, 2013

"A hefty tableau of beautifully gnashed teeth."
This ambitious graphic novel traces the chaotic, bloody early history of the modern Jewish state in Palestine, focusing on a fractious family living in the hotly contested city of Jerusalem. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARATHON by Boaz Yakin
YOUNG ADULT
Released: June 19, 2012

"Among the most historically and culturally significant battles ever fought, Marathon gets righteous due—and so does its greatest hero. (Graphic historical fiction. 12-15)"
Retold in expressionistic blurs of action, this account of the battle of Marathon chronicles at once a glorious win for the underdogs and an awe-inspiring personal achievement. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 20, 1973

"One of those special, hopefully not too special, books which pads softly through the dark underbrush of much that we feel and hope and sense and magnifies experience on several levels, simultaneously."
"A map is the dead body of where you've been. A map is the unborn baby of where you're going" — and a lion, well a map might lead to a lion in some distant, primal part of the world for even if lions are extinct they are very much alive in the imaginations of Boaz-Jachin and his father Jachin-Boaz, a mapmaker who has lost his bearings somewhere in the middle of middle age. Mr. Hoban who has been charming a younger audience for many years has now written a teasing, perhaps even disturbing, fantasia about father and son, any father and son, and maps and lions — particularly lions as emblematic of the chimera, the challenge, the absolute. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIBERTARIANISM by David Boaz
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 15, 1997

"Despite struggling with tunnel-vision, Boaz tries to be an intellectually honest cheerleader for capitalism and produces a work that should be taken seriously. (For another view of libertarianism, see Charles Murray's What It Means to Be a Libertarian, p. 1657.)"
From theoretical roots to contemporary policies, Boaz, who is executive vice president of the Cato Institute, a conservative think tank, presents a solid introduction to a trendy ideology. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEAT by Amy Boaz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2009

"Satisfyingly subtle and rich."
Boaz follows her debut (A Richer Dust, 2008) with another finely wrought novel rooted in literary history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A RICHER DUST by Amy Boaz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2008

"Readers need know nothing about Lawrence and his circle to become engrossed in this evocative tale."
An attempt to establish a new world Utopia in the American Southwest succumbs to a clash of genders and cultures in this subtly compelling historical novel, the author's debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

QUARRY by Noel T. Boaz
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 12, 1993

"Peppery, informative bones of contention."
``Have they found it?'' will be the query of most readers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ECO HOMO by Noel T. Boaz
NON-FICTION
Released: July 30, 1997

"Boaz's thought-provoking subject makes up for his sometimes clumsy prose style; worth a look by anyone interested in our origins and probable future."
An intensive exploration of our current knowledge of the ecological influences on human evolution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MURDER AT THE MLA by D.J.H. Jones
Released: April 1, 1993

"Fans of David Lodge's satires and Robert Barnard's academic mysteries will regret pseudonymous Jones's missed opportunities."
Six thousand literature teachers and grad students convene in Chicago for the annual Modern Language Association convention, then watch their numbers diminish alarmingly as the entire Wellesley hiring committee is poisoned (one fatality) and detestable deconstructionist Michael Alcott (U. of Arizona) is pushed over an atrium ledge while craning to see Jacques Derrida—with more victims still to be scheduled. Read full book review >