Search Results: "Bob Mayer"


BOOK REVIEW

BOB by Tracey Campbell Pearson
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 25, 2002

"A lighthearted, wonderfully illustrated story. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Bob the rooster is going through an identity crisis in Pearson's (G-Rex, 2000, etc.) clever barnyard tale that combines subtle humor with colorful watercolor illustrations and lively rough-line drawings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Z by Bob Mayer
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

Although retired from the US Army, Dave Riley is not out of the action as he battles crafty villains and a deadly pestilence in southwestern Africa in this sixth installment of Mayer's absorbing and well-written series (Cut-Out, 1995, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CUT-OUT by Bob Mayer
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Sinewy writing only enhances this already potent action fix."
This latest installment in the Dave Riley military thriller series (Dragon SIM-13, 1992, etc.) is an adrenaline cocktail from start to finish. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DRAGON SIM-13 by Bob Mayer
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"Mayer's tough, businesslike soldiers again include a tough, businesslike female."
A realistic, computer-driven, military-training exercise becomes a harrowing real-life foray into China for a Special Forces team stationed in Korea. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SYNBAT by Bob Mayer
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Action-packed entertainment—with primate villains that are not, alas, based on paranoid fantasies but on probable results of research programs reported to have been funded by the US government."
In the atavistic milieu plausibly conjured up by Mayer for his latest thriller (Eyes of the Hammer, Dragon SIM-13), Synbats are synthetic battle forms—expendable, elementally sentient, genetically altered baboons developed for military duties deemed too hazardous or risky for higher-order troops. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EYES OF THE HAMMER by Bob Mayer
Released: July 1, 1991

"The male-female bonding in battle is of interest."
First novel, by an ex-Green Beret, in which America's eagerness to cut the Colombian connection plays into the hands of the worst of the druglords—and it is up to one wiry little soldier and a tough CIA lady to stop the fiend before he owns Colombia outright. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOB, NOT BOB! by Liz Garton Scanlon
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"For a book that really comes down to a sick kid yelping for his mother, his nose so clogged it needs dynamite to clear, the story has a lot of adorable acreage. (Picture book. 3-5)"
When you're sick and stuffy, some letters—like T's and L's and M's—disappear. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIG BOB, LITTLE BOB by James Howe
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"Free to be Big Bob, Little Bob, and Blossom. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Friendship transcends gender norms. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DON’T LOOK DOWN by Jennifer Crusie
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 4, 2006

"Oddly wimpy and not much fun."
Mayer and the usually irresistible Crusie (Bet Me, 2004, etc.) stumble in this romantic action film of a novel about a woman trying to direct a romantic action film set near Savannah, Ga. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AGNES AND THE HITMAN by Jennifer Crusie
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 21, 2007

"Lots of sugar and little substance, but a fun ride nonetheless."
Crusie and Mayer team up again (Don't Look Down, 2006) in a comic caper and raucous romance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOB MARLEY by Garry Steckles
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Crosses the line from admiring Marley to uncritical celebrity worship."
Chronological birth-to-death sketch of Jamaica's premier musician. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOB MARLEY by Bruce W. Talamon
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"As a result, they not only are more interesting but also convey more powerfully a sense of Marley's genuine charisma."
Talamon's duotone photographs capture Jamaican reggae star Bob Marley (194581) with a rough humanity that comes as a relief after Steffens's hagiographic text. Read full book review >