Search Results: "Brent Hartinger"


BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST CHANCE TEXACO by Brent Hartinger
FICTION
Released: March 1, 2004

"Some graphic profanity. (Fiction. 13+)"
This is teenage Lucy Pitt's last chance: Sent to yet another group home, she struggles to fit in because if she screws up here, it's off to a notorious last refuge for hopeless incorrigibles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHADOW WALKERS by Brent Hartinger
FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

After his parents' deaths, Zach is doomed to live under his grandparents' rule on a remote island. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PROJECT SWEET LIFE by Brent Hartinger
FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2009

"Despite the material's overall pleasantness and sturdy sense of place, it doesn't engage until far too late, at which time readers may well have lost interest. (Fiction. 12 & up)"
This old-fashioned boys' yarn's jaunty premise—that three 15-year-old boys can circumvent working at dreary summer jobs and instead make $7,000 (the amount they figure their wages would yield) fast so they can spend a leisurely summer spelunking, scuba diving, bike riding and swimming—takes a single chapter to set up. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DREAMQUEST by Brent Hartinger
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: May 1, 2007

"There's no depth to this heavily exclamation-mark-laden adventure, but Julie's entertaining and humorous quest leads to a satisfying conclusion. (Fantasy. 8-10)"
Eleven-year-old Julie can't take it anymore. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 30, 2013

"Fans of the series will revel in this smart, quirky YA novel that's ripe with substance beyond the surface."
In Hartinger's (The Order of the Poison Oak, 2005, etc.) newest YA installment in the Russel Middlebrook series, Russel finds his wishes for adventure unexpectedly granted in the form of a counterculture-loving, Dumpster-diving new guy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ORDER OF THE POISON OAK by Brent Hartinger
FICTION
Released: March 1, 2005

"Teens—gay and straight—will connect. (Fiction. YA)"
Sixteen-year-old Russell and his two best friends, Gunnar and Min, from the Goodkind High School Gay-Straight-Bisexual Alliance sign up to be camp counselors at sleep-away camp. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE OTTO DIGMORE DIFFERENCE by Brent Hartinger
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 12, 2017

"A heartwarming story about staying true to yourself whatever others might think."
A struggling actor takes a life-changing road trip with his best friend in this novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THREE TRUTHS AND A LIE by Brent Hartinger
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"The story is suspenseful, with excellent pacing, self-aware humor, and a twist that Hartinger pulls off as well as the best slasher films. (Thriller. 14-18)"
Anyone who's ever watched a horror movie knows: don't go into the woods. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

This upbeat, bifurcated third installment of the Geography Club saga follows the narratives of not one but two queer characters: gay-straight alliance chums Russel Middlebrook and his best friend Min. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRAND AND HUMBLE by Brent Hartinger
FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2006

"It's all about fate and connections for the grand and the humble. (Fiction. YA)"
Harlan is cool and Manny is a geek, but both inhabit this unnamed town, and their paths crisscross in odd ways. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GEOGRAPHY CLUB by Brent Hartinger
FICTION
Released: March 1, 2003

"Hartinger has to jiggle the plot to make it work, Russel's adventures in heterosexual dating feel forced and the conclusion strains credibility, yet overall the book is provocative, insightful, and in the end comforting. (Fiction. 12+)"
Much to his surprise (and relief), a closeted gay boy in high school discovers that he isn't the only homosexual teenager in his community. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A LONG DAY AT THE END OF THE WORLD by Brent Hendricks
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 12, 2013

"A tough journey. For Hendricks, the discovery that counts is that the conjuring of his father's presence during his bleak and lonely pilgrimage has brought him to realize that perhaps he can love him again after all."
A memoir in the form of a strange pilgrimage, filled with apocalyptic images, through the present-day South to the place in Georgia where hundreds of corpses were found rotting outside a crematory. Read full book review >