Search Results: "Brian Harris"


BOOK REVIEW

CALLING MR. BEIGE by Brian Harris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 19, 2017

"A delightful, amusing fantasy about folks whom everyone ignores."
In this comedic novel, a man vainly tries to get people's attention. Read full book review >

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I CAME, I DANCED, I WENT VIRAL
by Jennie K.

BOOK REPORT for Deacon Locke Went to Prom by Brian Katcher

Cover Story: Puttin’ On The Ritz
BFF Charm: Let Me Love You
Swoonworthy Scale: 5
Talky Talk: I Came, I Danced, I Went Viral
Bonus Factors: Kick-Ass Gram, Internet Fame
Relationship Status: Drinking Buddy

Cover Story: Puttin’ On The Ritz

This cover is great: it screams “prom,” but ...


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JESSICA B. HARRIS
by Maya Payne Smart

Scenic and engaging, My Soul Looks Back recounts the years author Jessica B. Harris spent on the periphery of a circle of friends that included literary powerhouses James Baldwin, Maya Angelou, and Toni Morrison. The memoir spans the globe and several decades to describe the fascinating group.

Harris was in a relationship with Baldwin’s close friend Samuel Clemens Floyd III ...


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PLAYTIME WITH MCKISSACK
by Julie Danielson

Award-winning author Patricia C. McKissack (born in middle Tennessee, I proudly add) has had a long and distinguished career in the field of children’s literature. Not one to rest on her laurels—I believe she will turn 73 this year—she’s bringing readers this month a superb new book, a volume that I’ve no doubt we’ll judge later as one of the ...


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PATRICIA C. MCKISSACK
by Jessie Grearson

Have you ever wondered who wrote “Amazing Grace” or thought about the haunting story behind the hymn “I’ll Fly Away”? Ever skipped rope to “Hot Pepper” or counted “Eenie, Meenie, Miney, Mo”? Then Let’s Clap, Jump, Sing & Shout; Dance, Spin & Turn it Out!: Games, Songs & Stories from an African American Childhood is for you. Award-winning author Patricia ...


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BOOK REVIEW

HOT, COLD, SHY, BOLD by Pamela Harris
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"One picture that spans an entire spread—of two girls facing each other—is spoiled because the book's binding falls at a crucial area of the photograph; it shows that their 'how-do-you-do' faces are aimed not at each other, but at the buggy occupant of a jar. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A concept book in photographs that holds nothing new for those familiar with Tana Hoban's or Margaret Miller's work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARMALADE AND THE MAGIC BIRDS by Robin Harris
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2001

"No magic here. (Picture book. 4-8)"
An intrepid orange cat and a larcenous magician are the protagonists of this offbeat tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TUESDAY IN ARIZONA by Marian Harris
ADVENTURE
Released: May 1, 1998

"The illustrations, making use of all the exaggeration of political cartoons, feature familiar details of the Sonoran Desert, and readers will have fun poring over every page, in search of the punch line that gives the deadpan text its edge. (Picture book. 4-7)"
An atmospheric tale about a prospector and a pack rat in the desert lopes along at a leisurely pace. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 6, 2015

"May appeal to a straight, Christian audience who haven't had sex before marriage."
A transcript of an extended conversation between a husband and wife about their theories on what makes for the best sex, including descriptions of specific acts and emotional exercises. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUNEMARKS by Joanne Harris
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 8, 2008

"A mini-course in Norse mythology for the tween set. (Fiction. 10-14)"
The Lightning Thief meets The Sea of Trolls in this well-executed, if rather plodding children's debut by the author of the adult novel, Chocolat. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOHN CREASEY'S CRIME COLLECTION 1990 by Herbert Harris
Released: Dec. 15, 1990

The best of the assorted yearly stow volumes offers one imaginative frame-up (Julian Symons's "Waiting for Mr. McGregor"); two war stories (Peter Lovesey's final Comeuppance for a loser, and Mike Ripley's plight of a brewery); two identity mixups (involving Antonia Fraser's errant husband's mistress, and Basil Copper's traveling salesman); five tales of retribution (the ultimate in landlord/tenant relations by Michael Gilbert; a debacle in the bathtub, from the droll George Sims; a bad lie for a member of a golf club, from Judy Chard; a husband-killer from Margaret Yorke; and a scheming copper from lan Stuart); three family difficulties (Glyn Hardwicke's brother-bashing; editor Harris's brother-sister poker party; and Tony Wilmot's abusive wife); one confessional (an overlong mental-aberration story by Peter Godfrey); and two joyous standouts: H.R.F. Keating's bit of classic detection from a char at the British Museum, and Jean McConnell's "Last Post," a chilling creative bit of blackmailing. Read full book review >