Search Results: "Brock Clarke"


BOOK REVIEW

EXLEY by Brock Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 5, 2010

"A seriously playful novel about the interweave of literature and life."
Another literary high-wire performance by a novelist who is establishing himself as a unique voice in contemporary fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ORDINARY WHITE BOY by Brock Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"An almost charming hero and a vivid sense of small-town life, but the story fails to make a true claim on the reader's attention—especially when the painstakingly elaborated racial theme dissolves at the end into vapid irrelevancy."
A pallid first novel chronicles a year in the life of a desultory college grad, startled into taking his life seriously by a perhaps racially motivated murder. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT WE WON’T DO by Brock Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"An uneven debut offering an imagination a touch too fond of novelty, a bit too carried away with its own fictive swagger, and a bit too droll in its emotional reticence to capture a reader's enduring interest."
Brock follows his debut novel (The Ordinary White Boy, p. 960) with a prizewinning first collection of 14 stories: a flat if engaging thrum along the themes of loss and despair, in working-class upstate New York, in which mostly male characters find themselves confused in midlife. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AN ARSONIST’S GUIDE TO WRITERS’ HOMES IN NEW ENGLAND by Brock Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 4, 2007

"A serious novel that is often very funny and will be a page-turning pleasure for anyone who loves literature."
A subversively compelling, multilayered novel about the profound impact of literature (perhaps negative as well as positive). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WE FORGOT BROCK! by Carter Goodrich
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"Forget Brock. (Picture book. 4-6)"
Phillip and Brock are best friends. They spend all their time goofing around together. The only problem is his parents can see Phillip but not Brock. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ARTHUR C. CLARKE by Neil McAleer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Useful to specialists and students of sf, but likely to disappoint the more general reader. (Thirty b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Science journalist McAleer (The Mind-Boggling Universe, 1987; The Body Almanac, 1985) turns his attention to one of the giants of his own field. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PADDY CLARKE HA HA HA by Roddy Doyle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 16, 1993

"A work of maturity and grace."
Irish writer Doyle's fourth novel (The Van, The Snapper, etc.)—and the just-announced 1993 Booker Prize winner: a story that depicts with remarkable acuity that extraordinary intensity of response that is at the heart of childhood. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COLLECTED STORIES OF ARTHUR C. CLARKE by Arthur C. Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Wonder."
A massive compendium brings together (most probably) every story—104 in total, at least 3 previously uncollected—ever written by grandmaster Clarke (3001: The Final Odyssey, 1997, etc). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAIR MONACO by Brock Cole
Kirkus Star
by Brock Cole, illustrated by Brock Cole
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"A vivid and satisfying testimony to the transforming power of hope and dreams. (Picture book. 4-9)"
Cole's words and pictures deliver his tale as effortlessly as a song, but one that pricks with intelligence, sorrow, and hope. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

crowded in the middle of nowhere by Bo Brock
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 19, 2014

"You don't have to live in the Lone Star State to enjoy these companionable tales of a country vet."
The casebook of Brock, a Texas veterinarian, reveals his most memorable cases and larger-than-life characters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 5, 2008

"Wonderful American social history and lots of fun."
He truly had cojones: Dr. John Brinkley became fabulously wealthy in the 1920s and ‘30s by inserting goat testicles into herds of men anxious about their manliness. Read full book review >