Search Results: "Bruce Littlefield"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 10, 2003

"The business she's in is almost beside the point: Corcoran could be selling plumbing supplies, and the story would still fly."
A New York City real-estate bigwig ebulliently describes the creation and life of her business, pegging her account to anecdotally rich advice acquired at her mother's knee. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2012

"A sincere first effort that aims to chip away at stereotypes surrounding same-sex parents."
With the assistance of Littlefield (co-author: The Truth Advantage: The 7 Keys to a Happy and Fulfilling Life, 2011, etc.), Wahls writes about growing up as the son of gay parents in the heartland. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HANGING BY A THREAD by Sophie Littlefield
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 11, 2012

"Intriguing and entertaining. (Paranormal mystery. 12 & up)"
Clare's paranormal ability to experience the past when she touches clothing involves her in a murder mystery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNFORSAKEN by Sophie Littlefield
FANTASY
Released: Oct. 11, 2011

"An unnecessary sequel that adds little. (Paranormal suspense. 12-18)"
Billed as a "companion," this is not so much a sequel to Banished (2010) as it is a retread. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOUSE OF GLASS by Sophie Littlefield
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 25, 2014

"While a solidly constructed book, certain headlines deserve respect and distance, and some may consider Littleton's account exploitative."
Littlefield (Garden of Stones, 2013, etc.) draws facts from a true crime to create a novel about vicious intruders who invade an upper-class family's home in Calumet, Minn. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BANISHED by Sophie Littlefield
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 12, 2010

"A weak ending with an irritating wait-a-minute-I-forgot-something moment leaves room for a sequel. (Paranormal. YA)"
In this formulaic, not-even-barely credible supernatural thriller decorated with stock characters and tiresome chases, high-school sophomore Hailey Tarbell has lived her entire life as an outcast, along with her drug-dealing grandmother and her developmentally challenged foster brother, in small-town Gypsum, Mo. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BAD DAY FOR PRETTY by Sophie Littlefield
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 8, 2010

"If you like a little mystery with your romance, Stella (A Bad Day for Sorry, 2009) is the gal for you. Readers who prefer crime to cute may want to give her a pass."
An amateur sleuth finds a corpse almost as fascinating as the sheriff's blue eyes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INFECTED by Sophie Littlefield
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"Meant to be a fast-paced teen thriller, this instead is a derivative novel that is readable but all-too-familiar. (Thriller. 14-18)"
This is a tale with all the elements popular in this phase of 21st-century teen lit, ranging from first (but oh-so-true) love to Eastern European bad guys to the age-old supermensch. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BAD DAY FOR SORRY by Sophie Littlefield
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 4, 2009

"First-timer Littlefield creates characters with just the right quirks who charm even in the face of unrealistic plot turns."
Renegade justice takes a turn when a domestic-violence case becomes a kidnapping. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BAD DAY FOR MERCY by Sophie Littlefield
Released: June 19, 2012

"One MacGuffin after another, with grisly sidelights now and then—exactly what fans have come to expect from hyperactive Littlefield (A Bad Day for Scandal, 2011, etc.)."
The ear looked just like Chip's even if it wasn't attached to his head anymore, said Gracellen, and it came attached to a note demanding $30,000 for the return of the rest of him alive. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"This book will thrill Littlefield's core of listeners; it will anger anyone who simply likes to play and watch games, rather than dwell on their greater cultural significance."
The well-known Boston-based National Public Radio host (Only a Game) slaps his quaint "ain't sports funny" shtick between two covers, leaving readers, unlike listeners, unable to switch the station. Read full book review >