Search Results: "Bruce Wood"


BOOK REVIEW

ALPHABET ADVENTURE by Audrey Wood
ABC BOOKS
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"Preschoolers can learn the names of the letters as they peruse the fascinating art, created with 3-D modeling software. (Picture book. 3-5)"
The alphabet letters are stuck on Alphabet Island. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TEN LITTLE FISH by Audrey Wood
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"The holistic story bubbles with life's endless cycle. (Picture book. 3-5)"
This charming, colorful counting tale of ten little fish runs full-circle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DEEP BLUE SEA by Audrey Wood
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

"Despite bright hues, bold graphics and a simple text that introduces sequencing as well as colors, this isn't one of the Woods' better efforts. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Awkward modeling mars the Photoshop-generated art of this otherwise slickly produced concept vehicle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALPHABET RESCUE by Audrey Wood
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"While the plot is a trifle thin, the hyper-realistic artwork, the bright colors, the spelling puzzles and the inventive use of letters within the text will no doubt appeal to children just becoming familiar with their ABCs. (Picture book. 3-5)"
In the newest installment of Audrey and Bruce Wood's alphabet series, Charley goes to visit his grandparents for the summer, and his lowercase letters go on vacation to Alphabet City, the place where they were born. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALPHABET MYSTERY by Audrey Wood
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"Still, it may be a stretch to call this a concept book. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Twenty-five lowercase letters go in search of the runaway Little x in the sequel to Alphabet Adventure (2001) by this mother-and-son team. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHRISTMAS ADVENTURE OF SPACE ELF SAM by Audrey Wood
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"They have an electric palette just this side of garish, will make readers want to reach inside the pages and pull the characters out, and vastly reward rereadings. (Picture book. 4-9)"
From the Toy Story school of 3-D computer animation comes this intergalactic Christmas drama from Wood (Sweet Dream Pie, p. 120, etc.) and son. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FULL MOON AT THE NAPPING HOUSE by Audrey Wood
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Fans will doubtless be happy to revisit old friends, but they will probably still reach for the original more than this once the novelty wears off. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Thirty-one years after a wakeful flea roused the heaped-up sleepers in The Napping House, a full moon finds the household struggling to get back to sleep.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SILLY SALLY by Audrey Wood
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1992

"A surefire read-aloud. (Picture book. 3-7)"
The characters in Wood's sunny, simple pen and watercolor illustrations fairly bounce off the page in this exuberant cumulative rhyme. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BIRTHDAY QUEEN by Audrey Wood
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"A sly, though problematic, nod of appreciation to mothers, hidden behind streamers, confetti and a mouthful of cake. (Picture book. 3-6)"
The Birthday Queen does everything possible to make sure birthday celebrations are perfect. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLUE SKY by Audrey Wood
Kirkus Star
by Audrey Wood, illustrated by Audrey Wood
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2012

"A high-voltage stimulus package that encourages close observation of and imaginative thinking about nature, not to mention playing with print to express ideas. (Picture book. 18 mos.-6)"
This depiction of the stratosphere in its ever-shifting splendor offers a catalog of concepts for young readers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A HOLE IN THE ROAD by Jakki Wood
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"The busy workers and watchers (of many colors and ages and both genders) will keep young readers intent on scanning the artwork for details. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Wood's latest will be a hit with the construction enthusiasts, but her point of view keeps readers at an uncomfortable distance. Read full book review >