Search Results: "Bryan Miller"


BOOK REVIEW

CUISINE RAPIDE by Pierre Franey
Released: April 4, 1989

Franey, The New York Times' "Sixty-Minute Gourmet," gives a new French name to his spiffy and uncomplicated offerings, which can be as simple as mashed potatoes or as quick as a five-minute salmon mousse. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1994

"And he explains how the others are grounded in the cuisine he knows and does best. (Book-of-the-Month- Club Alternate Selection)"
Franey, recently retired from his New York Times and syndicated food column, looks back with clarity, precision, and considerable charm on his Burgundy childhood in a food-centered family; his rigorous training in Paris eateries (after leaving home and school forever at 14); and his American career as a French chef making his name in restaurant kitchens, newspaper columns, cookbooks, and television series. ``Anyone who has ever tried to cook well knows that about 50 percent of the job is focus, the willingness to concentrate,'' Franey notes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LET IT SHINE by Ashley  Bryan
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 9, 2007

"Incorporated into these final spreads with the music are concluding illustrations for every song, each focusing on a shining source of light. (Nonfiction. 3-8)"
An extra-large trim size, a vibrant palette and Bryan's glorious cut-paper collage illustrations add up to a marvelous interpretation of three traditional African-American spirituals: "This Little Light of Mine," "Oh, When the Saints Go Marching In" and "He's Got the Whole World in His Hands." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALL NIGHT, ALL DAY by Ashley  Bryan
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: April 30, 1991

"Note on the spirituals. (Nonfiction. 4+)"
Twenty splendid examples of spirituals are provided with simple arrangements by David Manning Thomas (guitar chords also included). Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MARY MILLER
by Stephanie Buschardt

Despite its title, there’s not a lot of happiness going around in Mary Miller’s new collection, Always Happy Hour. “There is nothing more disgusting, really, than people enjoying themselves so thoroughly when you’re miserable,” writes Miller in the book’s opening story, a rather grim yet appropriate introduction to the morbid hilarity that’s to come in the following pages. More ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NIGHT HAS EARS by Ashley  Bryan
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

Every country boasts its own proverbs, but unless US children study a foreign language or live in a bilingual family, their exposure to these pithy sayings can be limited. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEAUTIFUL BLACKBIRD by Ashley  Bryan
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"Still, the rolling language and appealing illustrations make this a must. (Picture book/folktale. 4-7)"
Blackbird shares his gifts with the birds of Africa in this colorful read-aloud. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAN'T SCARE ME! by Ashley  Bryan
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 3, 2013

"This musical trickster breathes new life into an old tale. (Picture book. 4-8)"
It's Anansi. It's Coyote. No, it's a boy wonder who knows no fear. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TORNADO SLIM AND THE MAGIC COWBOY HAT by Bryan Langdo
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"An ebullient and refreshing venture Out West. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Colloquially told, with an epistolary twist, this Western tall tale of guileless cowboy Slim, who finds himself thrust into the role of a hero, packs a lot of charm. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SING TO THE SUN by Ashley  Bryan
POETRY
Released: Sept. 30, 1992

"There are some poignant moments here, and some intriguing thoughts, but these poems are most notable for their rhythmic, musical language—and as a foil for the lyrically decorative art. (Poetry/Picture book. 8+)"
Twenty-three short poems celebrating family, animals, flowers, and music, many of them alluding to a tropical island setting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Bryan makes real and palpable what chattel slavery meant and how it affected those who were enslaved; every child who studies American slavery would benefit from experiencing this historically grounded web of narratives. (author's note) (Picture book/poetry. 6-10)"
Bryan gives voices to the voiceless and presents the dreams of slaves who went to the grave without living them. Read full book review >