Search Results: "Burton Raffel"


BOOK REVIEW

BURTON by Frank McLynn
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 1991

"Edward Rice's best-selling Captain Sir Richard Francis Burton (1990). (Eight pages of b&w illustrations, four maps.)"
Graceful, psychologically astute portrait of the enigmatic author/scholar/explorer who was one of the first Christians to enter Mecca, discovered Africa's Lake Tanganyika, and translated such masterpieces as the Kama Sutra and The Arabian Nights. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CANTERBURY TALES by Geoffrey Chaucer
Released: Nov. 18, 2008

Burton Raffel has made two key decisions in his rendition of Chaucer's greatest work. While most editions stick to the half-dozen or so best-known stories—the raunchy "Miller's Tale" and the proto-feminist "Wife of Bath's Tale" being the most popular with contemporary readers—Raffel offers modern English versions of even such unfinished fragments as "The Squire's Tale" and such often-skipped sections as "The Parson's Tale." Few today will be burning to hear from the longwinded parson, but in general this unabridged edition is a delight. It lets you appreciate the masterful way Chaucer unifies his stylistically and topically diverse stories with a few overarching themes: the proper relationship between man and woman (the answer's not what you'd expect from a 14th-century civil servant), the role of the clergy (they're only human in his realistic portraits), the all-powerful impact of chance on our destinies. Having the full text also enables readers to enjoy the sly way Chaucer toys with them, allowing his raconteurs to interrupt their narratives with such tantalizing phrases as, "but nothing like that can be included here." The unabridged edition provides more opportunities to savor the counterpoint of Chaucer's earthy humor against passages of piercingly beautiful lyric poetry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CANTERBURY TALES by Geoffrey Chaucer
Released: Nov. 18, 2008

Burton Raffel has made two key decisions in his rendition of Chaucer's greatest work. While most editions stick to the half-dozen or so best-known stories—the raunchy "Miller's Tale" and the proto-feminist "Wife of Bath's Tale" being the most popular with contemporary readers—Raffel offers modern English versions of even such unfinished fragments as "The Squire's Tale" and such often-skipped sections as "The Parson's Tale." Few today will be burning to hear from the longwinded parson, but in general this unabridged edition is a delight. It lets you appreciate the masterful way Chaucer unifies his stylistically and topically diverse stories with a few overarching themes: the proper relationship between man and woman (the answer's not what you'd expect from a 14th-century civil servant), the role of the clergy (they're only human in his realistic portraits), the all-powerful impact of chance on our destinies. Having the full text also enables readers to enjoy the sly way Chaucer toys with them, allowing his raconteurs to interrupt their narratives with such tantalizing phrases as, "but nothing like that can be included here." The unabridged edition provides more opportunities to savor the counterpoint of Chaucer's earthy humor against passages of piercingly beautiful lyric poetry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 1, 1994

"David's Day."
One of the many biographies of the actor, who died in 1984, including the surpassing Richard Burton: A Life (1988) by Melvyn Bragg and Richard Burton, My Brother (1988) by Graham Jenkins. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BURTON AND STANLEY by Frank O’Rourke
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1993

"Allen's wide-eyed pen-and-ink caricatures add to the humor. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A children's book debut by a prolific author of sports stories and westerns. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 9, 2017

"A dramatic, honest, moving narrative of how hard life can get and how one can still overcome seemingly insurmountable adversity to do good in the world."
How one woman finally broke away from a cycle of imprisonment and went on to help hundreds of other women re-enter normal life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RICHARD BURTON DIARIES by Richard Burton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 6, 2012

"A text that thrums with life and assures the rest is not silence."
The inspiring, salacious, sad, materialistic, insecure, arrogant, hilarious and dull ruminations of a most gifted actor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VIRGINIA LEE BURTON by Barbara Elleman
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Oct. 10, 2002

"Although one might wish for a little less gushing and a little more discussion of Burton's influence on subsequent illustrators, the close examination of Burton's own work makes this a valuable contribution to the literature of children's literature. (Biography. Adult/professional)"
A lavishly illustrated biography of the Caldecott Medal-winning author-illustrator is long on discussion of her work and short on life details. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BURTON AND THE GIGGLE MACHINE by Dorothy Haas
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 31, 1992

"The impressively industrious characters pursue ideas and feel the thrill of discovery, sending a powerful message that problem solving is hard work that can be both liberating and gratifying. (Fiction. 10-13)"
Professor Savvy has barely finished writing his promise—not to take anyone's invention ever again—100 times (Burton's Zoom Zoom Va-ROOM Machine, 1990) when he's back spying on Burton and his rocket-propelled skateboard. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CARRYING THE BODY by Dawn Raffel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Rambling and obscure, this ultimately incoherent story never convinces you of the pertinence (much less importance) of the events it describes."
A virtually unreadable debut novella by O, The Oprah Magazine editor Raffel (short fiction: In the Year of Long Division, 1995). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN THE YEAR OF LONG DIVISION by Dawn Raffel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 16, 1995

"Low-fat lit in need of some nourishment."
From Redbook's fiction editor, 16 short stories (some of which have appeared in various literary magazines) that coolly explore the human heart in pared-down prose. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SMASHER by Keith  Raffel
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"Silicon Valley fans will appreciate the use of the location and the tech talk and overlook Michaels's pretentious behavior over his ritual tea."
When a prosecutor is put into a coma by a mysterious hit-and-run driver, her beleaguered husband seeks justice. Read full book review >