Search Results: "Burton Raffel"


BOOK REVIEW

THE CANTERBURY TALES by Geoffrey Chaucer
Released: Nov. 18, 2008

Burton Raffel has made two key decisions in his rendition of Chaucer's greatest work. While most editions stick to the half-dozen or so best-known stories—the raunchy "Miller's Tale" and the proto-feminist "Wife of Bath's Tale" being the most popular with contemporary readers—Raffel offers modern English versions of even such unfinished fragments as "The Squire's Tale" and such often-skipped sections as "The Parson's Tale." Few today will be burning to hear from the longwinded parson, but in general this unabridged edition is a delight. It lets you appreciate the masterful way Chaucer unifies his stylistically and topically diverse stories with a few overarching themes: the proper relationship between man and woman (the answer's not what you'd expect from a 14th-century civil servant), the role of the clergy (they're only human in his realistic portraits), the all-powerful impact of chance on our destinies. Having the full text also enables readers to enjoy the sly way Chaucer toys with them, allowing his raconteurs to interrupt their narratives with such tantalizing phrases as, "but nothing like that can be included here." The unabridged edition provides more opportunities to savor the counterpoint of Chaucer's earthy humor against passages of piercingly beautiful lyric poetry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CANTERBURY TALES by Geoffrey Chaucer
Released: Nov. 18, 2008

Burton Raffel has made two key decisions in his rendition of Chaucer's greatest work. While most editions stick to the half-dozen or so best-known stories—the raunchy "Miller's Tale" and the proto-feminist "Wife of Bath's Tale" being the most popular with contemporary readers—Raffel offers modern English versions of even such unfinished fragments as "The Squire's Tale" and such often-skipped sections as "The Parson's Tale." Few today will be burning to hear from the longwinded parson, but in general this unabridged edition is a delight. It lets you appreciate the masterful way Chaucer unifies his stylistically and topically diverse stories with a few overarching themes: the proper relationship between man and woman (the answer's not what you'd expect from a 14th-century civil servant), the role of the clergy (they're only human in his realistic portraits), the all-powerful impact of chance on our destinies. Having the full text also enables readers to enjoy the sly way Chaucer toys with them, allowing his raconteurs to interrupt their narratives with such tantalizing phrases as, "but nothing like that can be included here." The unabridged edition provides more opportunities to savor the counterpoint of Chaucer's earthy humor against passages of piercingly beautiful lyric poetry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CARRYING THE BODY by Dawn Raffel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Rambling and obscure, this ultimately incoherent story never convinces you of the pertinence (much less importance) of the events it describes."
A virtually unreadable debut novella by O, The Oprah Magazine editor Raffel (short fiction: In the Year of Long Division, 1995). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN THE YEAR OF LONG DIVISION by Dawn Raffel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 16, 1995

"Low-fat lit in need of some nourishment."
From Redbook's fiction editor, 16 short stories (some of which have appeared in various literary magazines) that coolly explore the human heart in pared-down prose. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SMASHER by Keith  Raffel
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"Silicon Valley fans will appreciate the use of the location and the tech talk and overlook Michaels's pretentious behavior over his ritual tea."
When a prosecutor is put into a coma by a mysterious hit-and-run driver, her beleaguered husband seeks justice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAFE HOUSE by Burton Shulman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 1996

"Severely limited in range, but these tales of bleak, misshapen lives do offer a unified worldview—one more than a little familiar to anyone growing up male in America."
Probing men's insecurities with a vengeance, a debut collection of nine stories from Shulman gives a tightly focused but often repetitive view of macho misfiring and emotional turbulence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 2000

"An engaging overview that, unfortunately, backs away from the deeper questions it raises. (8 pp. b&w photos, not seen)"
An accessible history of the most glamorous of international awards. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YEHUDI MENUHIN by Humphrey Burton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 28, 2001

"A biography at once serious and entertaining, sensitive and critical: an unfailing joy to read."
A sensitive treatment of one of the best-loved musicians of a generation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Teens by Christine Burton
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 28, 2015

"A fun, easy-to-use kitchen addition."
Burton's colorful cookbook debut dishes up delectable recipes for beginners and old hands alike. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MELTING THE ICE by Jaci Burton
ROMANCE
Released: Feb. 4, 2014

"Fast-paced, with intense sex scenes and an intriguing jumble of the sports and fashion worlds, this steamy novel will satisfy those who like a little heat in their love stories."
Preparing her debut line for Fashion Week, Carolina Preston knows her brother's suggestion to have his best friend model for her is a good one—even if the one hot, secret night she shared in college with sexy hockey star Drew Hogan makes her wary. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2007

"The rot beneath Camelot's glittering surface is now an old story, but few books have so thoroughly examined the decay."
Veteran Kennedy chronicler Hersh (The Shadow President, 1997, etc.) examines the poisonous dynamic between Attorney General and FBI director. Read full book review >