Search Results: "Byron Barton"


BOOK REVIEW

MY BIKE by Byron Barton
Kirkus Star
by Byron Barton, illustrated by Byron Barton
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 14, 2015

"A natural for group storytimes, though plenty of single tots will enjoy seeing Tom's seemingly quotidian world suddenly transformed. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Barton (My Car, 2001; My Bus, 2014) wheels out another conveyance—but sends this one rolling past a set of escalating surprises to a high-wire climax. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY BUS by Byron Barton
by Byron Barton, illustrated by Byron Barton
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 15, 2014

"A pleasant ride, dissonance between the actual and described setting notwithstanding. (Picture book. 2-5)"
In an elemental bit of grouping and number play, Joe the bus driver picks up and drops off animal passengers on his route. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AIRPLANES; BOATS; TRAINS; TRUCKS by Byron Barton
Released: May 23, 1986

"These will delight the youngest, and have enough meat for older preschoolers and beginning readers."
Four very simple picture books on modes of transportation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HARRY IS A SCAREDY-CAT by Byron Barton
Released: March 1, 1974

"The happy match between Barton's blatant pop art style and the tone and setting of the story make it easy to relax and enjoy the ride."
We did not think we could take another picture book about a scaredy cat who turns suddenly brave after one pivotal experience, but Barton clearly asks no one to take Harry's metamorphosis seriously. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I WANT TO BE AN ASTRONAUT by Byron Barton
Released: June 1, 1988

"A great introduction to a popular topic."
In the bold, beautiful style made familiar in his other nonfiction for young children (e.g., Airport and Machines at Work), Barton follows a six-person crew (one—the narrator—female; two black) on a space shuttle mission. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AIRPORT by Byron Barton
illustrated by Byron Barton
Released: March 1, 1982

"But what youngsters could do, beginning with the people on the bus, is to make up their own stories and explanations; if they've actually been on a plane trip, they could provide a running narrative: Barton's pictures are, as usual, cheerful, interestingly composed, and infused with a spark of life."
In the pictures, as in a frieze, children can see what happens when you take a plane trip. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE'S AL? by Byron Barton
Released: Sept. 21, 1972

"With no words but the few that come in cartoon-style bubbles from the boy's mouth and almost no details on the black-outlined shapes of primary color, this might be described as minimal pop and it's minimally amusing."
Through city traffic that looks like it just emerged a little wobbly and shaken from Anne Rockwell's Thruway, a boy chases his runaway dog as the dog chases a cat. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEELS by Byron Barton
Released: March 16, 1979

"Useless."
Just about the least inventive, least rewarding treatment of the subject imaginable: even the pictures aren't worth looking at. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE THREE BEARS by Byron Barton
adapted by Byron Barton, illustrated by Byron Barton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"Attractive but not Barton's best. (Folklore/Picture book. 2-7)"
An illustrator noted for innovative use of bright color and bold forms turns in a predictable performance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BONES, BONES, DINOSAUR BONES by Byron Barton
Released: Sept. 30, 1990

"As usual, Barton's handsomely designed, brightly colored pages draw the eye as his thick, lined figures work busily away."
"Bones, Bones. We look for bones." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BUILDING A HOUSE by Byron Barton
Released: April 6, 1981

You could almost, watching, do it yourself—by carefully noting the steps depicted in each bright, brisk, clearly delineated picture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MACHINES AT WORK by Byron Barton
Released: Sept. 25, 1987

"The very simple images here make the book appropriate to the youngest; its directness is likely to inspire spontaneous dramatic play."
Using the bold, black bordered forms and simple colors familiar to readers of his other popular books, Barton introduces seven pieces of heavy machinery in action (plus people with drills and pickaxes) with a brief, imperative text ("Knock down that building. Read full book review >