Search Results: "Cal Armistead"


BOOK REVIEW

BEING HENRY DAVID by Cal Armistead
YOUNG ADULT
Released: March 1, 2013

"This compelling, suspenseful debut, a tough-love riff on guilt, forgiveness and redemption, asks hard questions to which there are no easy answers. (Fiction. 13 & up)"
When Hank wakes up in Penn Station, the only clue to his identity is the book he's clutching, Walden, so he adopts Henry David Thoreau's name and iconic work to guide him on his journey to self-discovery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

C, MY NAME IS CAL by Norma Fox Mazer
Released: Nov. 1, 1990

Continuing her lightweight alphabet of portraits of kids just entering their teens (A, My Name is Ami, 1987), Mazer introduces the series' first boy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Evil Empire of Cal Schank  by Lionel Domreis
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Dec. 5, 2012

"First-rate storytelling that propels an enticing plot."
A World War II vet and a Chinese neighborhood leader look for a way to bring down a ruthless mobster in 1950s Los Angeles in Domreis' debut mystery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAL AND THE AMAZING ANTI-GRAVITY MACHINE by Richard Hamilton
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2006

"Hilarious situations accompanied by lively spot illustrations make this an appealing offering for new readers, especially ones who are interested in science. (Fiction. 7-10)"
Cal and his talking dog, Frankie, are new to the neighborhood, and everyone in his family is having a hard time adjusting to the neighbor, Mr. Frout. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NIGHT LISTENER by Armistead Maupin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 2, 2000

"The postmodern, what-is-real? theme highlights Maupin's intellectual shortcomings rather than his emotional strengths, but strong storytelling, punchy humor, and a warmhearted narrator carry the day."
A touching but rather facile meditation on the way artists manipulate facts in their quest for truth, by the author of Maybe the Moon (1992) and the popular Tales of the City series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MICHAEL TOLLIVER LIVES by Armistead Maupin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 12, 2007

"Rueful but never regretful, warmhearted and witty: a treat for Maupin's many fans."
The central figure in Tales of the City returns two decades later and brings us up to date on most of the popular series' other characters as well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CRUEL AS THE GRAVE by John Armistead
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"Sheriff Bramlett's light is hidden under the bushel of Armistead's unsophisticated style."
This third Deep South procedural (A Homecoming for Murder, 1995, etc.) featuring Sheriff Grover Bramlett begins with a victim's-eye glimpse of a past murder. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAYBE THE MOON by Armistead Maupin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"A sad, funny tale that—although goodness may not always triumph in the world—will win readers' hearts."
Having published the final volume (Sure of You, 1989) of his popular Tales of the City series, Maupin leaves the San Francisco setting behind, turning his warmth and wit to the Hollywood scene; he remains equally adept at spotting trends and skewering social injustice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE THINGS THAT MATTER MOST by Cal Thomas
NON-FICTION
Released: May 31, 1994

"The text includes an awesomely self-congratulatory foreword from Rush Limbaugh. (First printing of 150,000; Conservative Book Club selection; $150,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Short, acerbic takes on contemporary mores from a widely syndicated newspaper columnist who views the state of the union with considerable alarm. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 17, 2009

"An exuberant but overblown tale of miraculous misfits."
A gaggle of disabled and otherwise different teens have their friendship tested by jealousy and hip-hop exclusionism in this gonzo young-adult fable. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOGICAL FAMILY by Armistead Maupin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 3, 2017

"Engaging reminiscences from an ebullient storyteller."
Friends, lovers, and a few celebrities form the author's logical, though not biological, family. Read full book review >