Search Results: "Caridad Ferrer"


BOOK REVIEW

WHEN THE STARS GO BLUE by Caridad Ferrer
FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 2010

"Soledad's first-person narration feels authentic, but the material would engage more if it were shorter and sharper. (Fiction. YA)"
Soledad Reyes, a Cuban-American high-school senior, lives to dance and hopes to win a spot in a professional ballet company. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A GIRL LIKE CHE GUEVARA by Teresa de la Caridad Doval
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2004

"Stiffly written and often simply amateurish, but an intriguing glimpse into Castro's Cuba by this first-time novelist."
Sex in Cuba, circa 1980. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONE SUMMER NIGHT by Caridad Pineiro
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 3, 2017

"A sexy, fun, yet touching summer read."
Trying to save her family's iconic New York department store, Maggie Sinclair doesn't have time for a love life, especially with Owen Pierce, the son of her father's archenemy, who's the boy she kissed years ago on one dreamy summer night at the Jersey Shore. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2013

"A wonderful resource for households, schools, Scouting groups and other organizations catering to kids. (index) (Nonfiction. 5 & up)"
Ferrer transports readers to a time gone by, when stoopball and jacks, string games and stickball, hopscotch and marbles were the staples of childhood. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

SOME FALL ROMANCE GLORY
by Bobbi Dumas

We’re moving swiftly into autumn territory here in Madison, and the beautiful fall foliage always makes me smile.

I grew up in El Paso, TX—smack dab in the middle of the Chihuahua desert—where very few deciduous trees grow. There was one type in my neighborhood (not natural to the area, I would guess) that would turn a bright yellow and ...


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BOOK REVIEW

LOM AND THE GNATTERS by Kurusa
by Kurusa, illustrated by Isabel Ferrer, translated by Elisa Amado
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"The bugs are a little adult in their tastes, but the slight story will remind young children of their own experiences with the dreaded comb, and Ferrer's rich, textured illustrations reveal new humorous surprises with each reading. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Inspired by her hairbrush-hating daughter, Venezuelan writer Kurusa sets her cautionary story in an imaginary East African savanna. Read full book review >