Search Results: "Carl Pearce"


BOOK REVIEW

THE NO-DOGS-ALLOWED RULE by Kashmira Sheth
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"Just right for aspiring pet owners. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Third-grader Ishan Mehra wages a successful campaign to repeal his mother's no-dogs-allowed rule by gently introducing her to a neighbor's dog. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SILENCE SEEKER by Ben Morley
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2010

"Ultimately this British import leaves readers with as much of a letdown as it does its protagonist. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A new boy and his family—"asylum seekers"—have moved into Joe's building. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

SHE'LL PUT A SPELL ON YOU
by Mandy Curtis

BOOK REPORT for Cold Spell (Fairytale Retellings #4) by Jackson Pearce

 

Cover Story: In-Flight Entertainment

BFF Charm: Heck Yes

Swoonworthy Scale: 3

Talky Talk: Fairy Tale Thriller

Bonus Factor: Mysterious Loner Lady

Anti-bonus Factor: Cold Weather

Relationship Status: Just Getting Warmed Up

 

Cover Story: In-Flight Entertainment

There’s definitely something sinister about this cover: the frozen thorns, the broken ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

SISTERS RED by Jackson Pearce
Released: June 8, 2010

"This urban fantasy with its scarred heroine and intermittent violence is not for Twilight fans but may well appeal to Melissa Marr's readers and teens who like their fantasy on the gritty side. (Fantasy. YA)"
This is not the tale of Little Red Riding Hood your granny told. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE INSIDE JOB by Jackson Pearce
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 12, 2016

"Wacky and action-packed. (Thriller. 9-12)"
After leaving the evil spy organization they were raised in, 12-year-old Hale and his younger sister, Kennedy, are determined to bring down the nefarious Sub Rosa Society, find their MIA parents, and save the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MARK OF THE PASHA by Michael Pearce
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2008

"Pearce (The Point in the Market, 2003, etc.) makes his historical tales so witty and plausible that you'll regret missing Cairo's heyday. Pump up the air conditioning and enjoy."
Religious uprisings, political unrest, British snobbery and Egyptians languishing in the public baths—it must be another trip to turn-of-the-last-century Cairo. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 1, 1992

"If you're not expecting a whodunit—as usual, there are no big surprises saved for the end—this is as charming a historical mystery as you'll find this summer."
Pearce hits his stride with this third tale of Gereth Cadwallader Owen, the Mamur Zapt (...and the Return of the Carpet, ...and the Night of the Dog) of the Anglo-Egyptian political police. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAMUR ZAPT AND THE GIRL IN THE NILE by Michael Pearce
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"Pearce's pace is as deliberate and gravely amused as ever, but his uncharacteristic focus on a central mystery comes at a high price: Lacking the local color of Owen's four earlier adventures, this one is his least distinctively charming and amusing to date."
Called away from a routine arms search to examine the corpse of a young woman who's fallen from a pleasure boat moored in the Nile, Gareth Cadwallader Owen, the Mamur Zapt of 1909 Cairo (The Mamur Zapt and the Men Behind, 1993, etc.), finds that the body has already disappeared. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 20, 1987

"They should also be good for book-talking or reading aloud."
Short stories can be hard to sell to children, but this collection is worth pushing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SWEETLY by Jackson Pearce
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Aug. 23, 2011

"Not Pearce's best. (Fantasy. 14 & up)"
An uneven retelling of "Hansel and Gretel" swaps witches for werewolves. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WAY TO SATTIN SHORE by Philippa Pearce
Released: April 9, 1984

"The mystery is a cover, of sorts, for emotional and psychological baring that would otherwise be too much."
Here is Kate Tranter coming home from school in the January dusk—the first to come, because she is the youngest of her family." Read full book review >