Search Results: "Carl Pletsch"


BOOK REVIEW

YOUNG NIETZSCHE by Carl Pletsch
NON-FICTION
Released: July 22, 1991

"In spite of its decisive tone, Pletsch's intriguing study is speculative and needs to be seen in relation to other studies of creativity."
Here, Pletsch (Intellectual History/Miami Univ., Ohio) describes both how Nietzsche consciously chose to become a genius and the cultural conditions that allowed him to do so—the cult of genius itself, its 18th-century secular origins, its function in a period of progress, and Nietzsche's redefinition of it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2012

"Good for one-on-one sharing or paired with titles such as Saxton Freymann's Fast Food (2006) for a festive, food-themed storytime. (list of foods portrayed in each photo) (Picture book. 4-8)"
Peek into worlds where the trees are made of broccoli and the clouds of sweet meringue. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCAT by Carl Hiaasen
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 13, 2009

"Hiaasen's third outing for young readers might be a little slow in pacing and the character types might be recognizable to experienced readers, but fans of Hoot and Flush (2002, 2005) will not be disappointed by this funny, believable, environmentally friendly tween thriller. (Thriller. 10-15)"
During a field trip to Black Vine Swamp, a suspicious "wildfire" breaks out, and much-feared and -reviled science teacher Mrs. Starch vanishes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TETHER by Carl Phillips
Released: April 1, 2001

"In the best cases, that hard thought flowers into feeling and makes the poems memorable."
Phillips's fifth collection is a difficult one of lean, stubbornly metaphysical lyrics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NO by Carl Djerassi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"But for insight into the grants apparatus, the bureaucracy of science, and the way scientists think and work, Djerassi's your man."
Stanford professor Djerassi (Menachem's Seed, etc.), eminent chemist and —Father of the Pill,— here concludes his 'science-in-fiction— tetralogy with another speculation about the frontiers of sexuality, this time concerning the effects of nitric oxide (NO) on male impotence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMERICAN ISIS by Carl Rollyson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 29, 2013

"A mostly successful attempt at a fresh understanding through analogies, but the enduring sadness of her loss threatens, as ever, to overwhelm."
The previous biographers of Plath (1932-1963) didn't really get it, writes Rollyson (Journalism/Baruch Coll.; Hollywood Enigma: Dana Andrews, 2012, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CASE OF THE YELLOW DIAMOND by Carl Brookins
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"In truth, the essential lack of mystery makes it not much of a case and gives Sean, despite his unruffled self-confidence, very little to do as a detective. But readers who prefer mildly facetious non sequiturs to challenging puzzles and strenuous action may just find that this modest little tale hits the spot."
Pint-sized Minneapolis private eye Sean Sean tangles with the shadowy forces who want to stop Jocelyn Bartelme's search for her great uncle, missing and presumed dead since 1944. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHALLENGES OF MASCULINITY by Carl Erikson
Released: Oct. 6, 2016

"An ultimately encouraging exploration that aims to show men how to throw off societal expectations."
A thorough study of what it means to be a man in modern society. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CASE OF THE DECEIVING DON by Carl Brookins
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 20, 2008

"Brookins (Bloody Halls, 2008, etc.) makes the case a cluttered, low-energy affair that fizzles out instead of winding up. On the plus side, there is a distinctly original motive for Don Molinaro's demise."
A Twin Cities private eye investigates when a resident of the retirement home across the street is murdered. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 30, 1993

"An illuminative briefing on a little-known but invaluable source of intelligence during WW II. (Maps, photos, and tabular material—some seen.)"
One of Washington's key sources of information on Hitler's designs during WW II was Japan's ambassador to Germany, General Hiroshi Oshima. Read full book review >