Search Results: "Carlos Fuentes"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 1, 1990

"Fuentes' fans may appreciate his wire-walking here, while others will be reminded of better things he's done."
This second collection (Burnt Water, 1980) of five long stories from Fuentes (Christopher Unborn, The Old Gringo, etc.) is full of sound, fury, and various linguistic innovations, as well as a sustained meditation on the relationship between art and life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DEATH OF ARTEMIO CRUZ by Carlos Fuentes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1964

"The publishers will support it accordingly."
Seventy-one years old, wasted and sick with a degrading intestinal affliction, Artemio Cruz lies in bed and remembers — remembers and lives while the priest administers extreme Unction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHRISTOPHER UNBORN by Carlos Fuentes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1989

"Fuentes, sometimes too erudite for his own good, gets it together here—developing an inventive literary conceit into a multilayered meditation on the plight of contemporary Mexico."
A postmodern extravaganza narrated by a fetus: his conception on Twelfth Night begins the book and his birth on Columbus Day ends it, and in between those two events is a feast of language concerning a despoiled Mexico. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TERRA NOSTRA by Carlos Fuentes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1976

"The prose is incantatory but ultimately exhausting."
History and the dream interpenetrate in this outsized novel which summons into fevered, hallucinatory existence the Spain that conquered the author's native Mexico. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE OLD GRINGO by Carlos Fuentes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1985

"Excessively hectoring and deterministic, a book that's unusually soapy and obvious from a writer as often adroit as Fuentes."
Set during the era of the Villa uprising in Mexico, 1916, Fuentes' book tracks the mysterious passage made by cynic/satirist Ambrose Bierce, at age 71, into then very dangerous Mexico, the place where he wished to end his life: "But maybe he was carrying a different fear, one he voiced as he crossed the frontier: 'I'm afraid that each of us carries the real frontier inside.'" Bierce is a mass of regrets—mostly because the cavalier manner of his literary persona undermined his capacity for family love—and in Mexico he seeks a stark finale for his life, an expiation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MYSELF WITH OTHERS by Carlos Fuentes
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 1, 1998

"For all its gloss and sophisticated reach, then, a minor, disappointing book."
The scope of Fuentes' essays is attractively broad—from two elegant pieces of writerly autobiography to long discursions on Gogol, Diderot, Cervantes, and Bunuel, to an admonitory Harvard commencement address on the evils of US insensitivity to Latin America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HYDRA HEAD by Carlos Fuentes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 5, 1978

"A bumpy ride, then, serious but unsure of itself, neither smoothly entertaining nor genuinely provocative."
In marked contrast to Fuentes' last novel, the broad-keeled and mythic Terra Nostra, this is a spy mystery, a sort of object fable linking the subterranean and inherently puzzling Mexican character to shady, cloak-and-dagger goings-on. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE THE AIR IS CLEAR by Carlos Fuentes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 7, 1960

"Written with a fervor that is both fierce and compassionate this is a complex, powerful novel of huge scope."
"In Mexico City there is never tragedy but only outrage", says the poetic and tormented voice of this tumultuous philosophical and political novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CAMPAIGN by Carlos Fuentes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Exasperatingly expository and episodic—but, still, Fuentes manages to persuade us of the Spanish-American rationale for a continuing revolution and to explore (very unsystematically) the 'possibility of establishing a relationship with God through language."
With this first volume of a projected trilogy about 19th-century revolutionary Spanish America, the prolific Fuentes (Constancia, 1990; Christopher Unborn, 1989; etc.) offers a baggy, robust tale about a political kidnapping and its human consequences. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 14, 1992

"Strictly an introduction to a complex subject, but, in its yearning and contradictions, an unusually revealing one."
A companion volume to an upcoming Discovery/BBC TV series, this passionate meditation on Hispanic cultural identity from Fuentes (Constancia, 1990, etc.) unfolds with all the color, urgency, and perhaps inevitable superficiality of a popular documentary. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIS I BELIEVE by Carlos Fuentes
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 8, 2005

"Either way, This I Believe is full of pleasures. Whatever their setting, the most memorable of these pieces ably show why Fuentes has been so well regarded all these years."
An autumn-of-life exercise in taking stock by the renowned Mexican novelist and essayist (Inez, 2002, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ORANGE TREE by Carlos Fuentes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1994

"Exuberantly imaginative and unabashedly sensual, Fuentes, even when the conceits seem strained, never fails to entertain, instruct — and, yes, provoke."
Fuentes continues to interpret the clash between the Old and New Worlds with dazzling imaginative insight in five novellas that span a spectrum of eras and individuals. Read full book review >