Search Results: "Caroline Stevermer"


BOOK REVIEW

MAGIC BELOW STAIRS by Caroline Stevermer
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2010

"Lovely and lively. ('According to Bess' glossary) (Historical fantasy. 8-12)"
Frederick is an orphan in the kind of institution where boys get locked in the stillroom for minor infractions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A COLLEGE OF MAGICKS by Caroline Stevermer
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1994

"Stevermer has made a successful transition to adult entertainment; which, as others have discovered, is by no means as easy as it looks."
The first adult-oriented fantasy from the author of various juveniles (River Rats, 1992, etc.), set in an intriguing, not-so- different early 20th-century alternate world where magic works unobtrusively. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RIVER RATS by Caroline Stevermer
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1992

"Not up to David Brin's Postman (1986); still, a sturdy, not overearnest sf adventure. (Fiction. 11-13)"
Again the call of ``Mark Twain!'' rings out from a stately riverboat, this time as it paddles the toxic Mississippi in a wry post-apocalyptic novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SCHOLAR OF MAGICS by Caroline Stevermer
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 1, 2004

"Samuel and Jane's burgeoning romance, impossibly decorous by modern standards, provides some diversion, but overall it's more misdirection than substance: Fun in places."
Sequel to Stevermer's A College of Magics (1994), a tale set in an alternate Edwardian world where, unobtrusively, magic works. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN THE KING COMES HOME by Caroline Stevermer
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 1, 2000

"Beautifully rendered, if ultimately promising more than it delivers: still, fantasy of a high order."
New fantasy from the author of A College of Magicks (1994). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FANTASY
Released: May 1, 2003

"Although Miranda and Sir Hilary exist mainly to be villainous, and the remaining characters serve mainly as plot devices or running jokes, this clever romp will appeal to fans of Regency romance and light fantasy. (Fantasy. YA)"
Long out-of-print, a cult epistolary fantasy makes a welcome return. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GRAND TOUR by Patricia C. Wrede
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"Like the cucumber sandwiches on which the characters nibble, an elegant and refreshing treat, but ultimately unsubstantial. (Fantasy. YA)"
A frothy follow-up to Sorcery and Cecelia (2003) serves another sweet syllabub of historical fantasy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FANTASY
Released: Nov. 1, 2006

"A thoroughly enchanting confection. (Fantasy. YA)"
Another delightful epistolary fantasy set in an alternate, magical 19th-century England. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HATCHING CHICKS IN ROOM 6 by Caroline Arnold
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"Arnold captures the joy and mystery of this familiar unit of study. (glossary, websites, bibliography) (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
It's a lucky kindergartner who gets to witness the miracle of life through the incubation of eggs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A NIGHT ON THE TOWN by Caroline Merola
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 10, 2010

"A good addition to large collections. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Pickles McPhee longs for adventure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ERIC THE MATH BEAR by Caroline Glicksman
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 12, 2003

"It just doesn't add up. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Eric, a red glow-in-the-dark bear who works in a bank, foils a robbery in Glicksman's debut picture book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROSE AND THE WISH THING by Caroline Magerl
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 8, 2016

"This quirky, sidelong look at a common childhood experience will be just the thing for readers and listeners who enjoy a touch of whimsy and mystery (and who won't mind not finding out what the wish thing actually is—or exactly what happens next). (Picture book. 3-6)"
A lonely young girl makes a wish that eventually comes true in both magical and pragmatic ways. Read full book review >